Coquet and Coast Forum
Don't forget to check out our sister site: Amble and District

Go Back   Coquet and Coast Forum > Local History, Genealogy, People and Places > Amble and Hauxley

 We no longer use activation emails. Please allow 24h after sign up and your account should work
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 29-09-2012, 08:27 AM
Alan J. Alan J. is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Amble
Posts: 338
Default Duncans buildings.

I have, for some reason, known Duncans buildings or Duncans cottages to be directly behind your "red brick buildings" at the top of the Wynd. There is only one of these cottages left now, used for storage and it is adjoined to the bigger house next door that may have been one of the farmhouses at one time. There seems to have been a row of them from the bottom of Greenfield Terrace to Gibson street.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 29-09-2012, 03:59 PM
Coquet's Avatar
Coquet Coquet is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Amble
Posts: 3,185
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan J. View Post
I have, for some reason, known Duncans buildings or Duncans cottages to be directly behind your "red brick buildings" at the top of the Wynd. There is only one of these cottages left now, used for storage and it is adjoined to the bigger house next door that may have been one of the farmhouses at one time. There seems to have been a row of them from the bottom of Greenfield Terrace to Gibson street.

And that row of cottages fits nicely with the number on the census return, and also logically how they have listed them; Gibson Street ----around the corner to----Duncans Buildings ----and around the corner to ----Greenfield Terrace.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 29-09-2012, 05:13 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Nr Eglingham
Posts: 1,342
Default

The 1881 census shows DONKINS Cottages (4) between Greenfield Terrace and Gibson Street. The 1891 has them as DUNCAN'S Cottages The later censuses have DUNCAN'S Buildings in the same spot

Last edited by janwhin; 29-09-2012 at 05:19 PM. Reason: update
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 30-09-2012, 11:01 AM
Coquet's Avatar
Coquet Coquet is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Amble
Posts: 3,185
Default

"Donkin's" is just "Duncan's" in a healthy Amble accent. Just an error I would say Janwin ?
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 30-09-2012, 03:04 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Nr Eglingham
Posts: 1,342
Default

I can go with that one but I'm not sure that well known auction family of Donkin would have been impressed

I've tapped into my sister's cerebral silver mine about the arch and dwellings opposite Lambs Terrace but her seams are about as played out as mine

Anyway, a passageway ran down the side of the Bluebell. On the pub side there was a side entry to let you get your jug of ale without anybody being any the wiser in the pub and on the other there were a few flats. This is the 1950s, Mr Hume (of Cac fame) lived there as did the Douglas family with the Goldsteins upstairs.

She also reckons there was a blacksmith's up Acklington Street, above the Masons. Me, being so much younger, can't remember that one.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 30-09-2012, 03:35 PM
Coquet's Avatar
Coquet Coquet is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Amble
Posts: 3,185
Default re Donkin

I'm playing the 'spring chicken' card to cover my ignorance too. We've had a few auctioneers in Amble I think? Might be a business model to consider again in these recessionary times?


I remember Cac Hume clearly though. According to my mother I was a sickly child and one day Dr. Robertson came on a home visit. I had a plastic model of General Custer by the bedside and the doctor asked "is that General Custer?" "No No!" I indignantly replied, "it's Cac Hume!"
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 30-09-2012, 03:46 PM
Coquet's Avatar
Coquet Coquet is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Amble
Posts: 3,185
Default



Do we have any information on the building at the end of Gibson Street - That must have been demolished and is now a public space with a seat & rose garden ? The original building was the biggest in Gibson Street - wonder if it had anything to do with the auctioneer? - or was it just a large house?
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 30-09-2012, 04:05 PM
Coquet's Avatar
Coquet Coquet is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Amble
Posts: 3,185
Default

Quote:
She also reckons there was a blacksmith's up Acklington Street, above the Masons. Me, being so much younger, can't remember that one.

Acklington Street or Road?
1897
A few buildings on the road that could be candidates. All now gone whatever they were. Looks like an orchard or something there too. The Steet is not yet built on this map.

Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 30-09-2012, 04:14 PM
Coquet's Avatar
Coquet Coquet is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Amble
Posts: 3,185
Default

Were the closets for Marks Row on the other side of the road?
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 30-09-2012, 06:14 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Nr Eglingham
Posts: 1,342
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Coquet View Post
I'm playing the 'spring chicken' card to cover my ignorance too. We've had a few auctioneers in Amble I think? Might be a business model to consider again in these recessionary times?


I remember Cac Hume clearly though. According to my mother I was a sickly child and one day Dr. Robertson came on a home visit. I had a plastic model of General Custer by the bedside and the doctor asked "is that General Custer?" "No No!" I indignantly replied, "it's Cac Hume!"
I don't think Dr Robertson would have been impressed with your response...he wasn't much taken with sick note charlies!
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 30-09-2012, 06:16 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Nr Eglingham
Posts: 1,342
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Coquet View Post
Were the closets for Marks Row on the other side of the road?
Water closets on Marks Row were definitely before my time. Still I don't think there would have been any danger of being mown down by Craiggs' bus in those days
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 30-09-2012, 06:22 PM
Alan J. Alan J. is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Amble
Posts: 338
Default Properties on Albert and Woodbine Streets.

1: There were flats in what is now the car park behind the Blue Bell and there was a shop, empty in my time,on the corner of the roadside, car sales now. This is also where there was a pub too at one time. Cliffwell garage was Thompsons Red Stamp Stores, I started there in 1956 as a 13 year old delivery boy, after school each evening and Saturdays, for 10s per week. They moved down to Queen Street in 1957 and I left school in 1958.
2: The blacksmiths shop was in the bungalow which stands at the entrance to Hope Terrace, before the block of two semis, it belonged to a Mr Pickard , Michael Howlistons grandfather, and Michaels mother had it made into it's present state after the blacksmithing finished.
3: The site on the corner of Gibson Street was originally a lodging house which was burnt down in the 1890's early 1900's leaving an open space which never seems to have been utilised.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 30-09-2012, 07:19 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Nr Eglingham
Posts: 1,342
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan J. View Post
1: There were flats in what is now the car park behind the Blue Bell and there was a shop, empty in my time,on the corner of the roadside, car sales now. This is also where there was a pub too at one time. Cliffwell garage was Thompsons Red Stamp Stores, I started there in 1956 as a 13 year old delivery boy, after school each evening and Saturdays, for 10s per week. They moved down to Queen Street in 1957 and I left school in 1958
Now my sister did mention Thompsons being there and then changed her mind. She will be pleased. I can only remember it as a long narrow shop down Queen Street. My friend's cousin worked there, Betty Clark. She also mentioned something about a kind of tank on the Cliffwell site that was drained and a goldfish was found in the bottom
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 02-10-2012, 12:49 PM
Coquet's Avatar
Coquet Coquet is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Amble
Posts: 3,185
Default

fascinating stuff as ever guys.
The Gibson Street building that burnt down; I see the west facing wall has survived, and in now incorporated into the gable end of the neighbouring building.
I wonder if the conflagration gets a mention in the papers? (janwin , hint hint )


On the subject of the "Gibson" that gave his name to Gibson Street - this must be a diffrerent Gibson to the town surveyor commemorated at the west cemetery, as his active period seems to post date the "Gibson Street" name considerably?







the 4 panels.

si monumentum requiris circumspice = "Latin for 'If you seek a monument, look around you', from the epitaph on Christopher Wren's tomb at St. Paul's Cathedral" ...nice.



Gibson's grave is a few metres from the fountain (above)
Died aged 77, September 23 1913


Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 02-10-2012, 01:13 PM
Alan J. Alan J. is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Amble
Posts: 338
Default Gable wall.

I too noticed the stone gable wall there yesterday. Looks unusual to have a stone wall on brick houses, seems to bear out the story of a previous building next door.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 02-10-2012, 01:36 PM
Coquet's Avatar
Coquet Coquet is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Amble
Posts: 3,185
Default

Maybe we shouldn't remind the council it's a brownfield site, they'll sell if off to build a block of flats on it

Definitely from the other building though, the stones on the face are angled differently to the red brick houses.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 02-10-2012, 02:09 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Nr Eglingham
Posts: 1,342
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Coquet View Post
fascinating stuff as ever guys.
The Gibson Street building that burnt down; I see the west facing wall has survived, and in now incorporated into the gable end of the neighbouring building.
I wonder if the conflagration gets a mention in the papers? (janwin , hint hint )
I can always respond to subtlety Ok I'm looking, but while I am, here's one, Morpeth Herald 11 March 1905: "For sale by private treaty, Gloster House, Amble, containing 7 rooms, and two tenemented houses of 4 and 3 rooms respectively. The property forms a corner site, being situated partly in High Street and Gibson Street. For further particulars apply to John Henderson, Railway Row, Broomhill."
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 02-10-2012, 02:30 PM
Coquet's Avatar
Coquet Coquet is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Amble
Posts: 3,185
Default

That must be it, as the one at the other side was known as 'Sunlight House'
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 02-10-2012, 03:26 PM
Coquet's Avatar
Coquet Coquet is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Amble
Posts: 3,185
Default

While we're on the subject of Gibson Street, here's a letter written by my G-G-Grandfather George Anthony Richardson (adopted by the Browns of Brown the plumber fame) The gentleman is pictured in another thread in his later years in Panhaven Road:


G.A. Richardson. Plumbers, Gas Fitters, Ironmongers and Tin-Plate Workers, etc.
No. 12 and 14 Queen Street, Amble.

To the Chairman & Members of the Amble District Council.

Gentlemen,

My Child having died from Diphtheria I am certain contracted through the insanitary conditions of the earth closets of the Gibson St. School - having examined the E.C.s myself I found them to be in a very unsanitary condition there being no ventilation in the roofs, & nothing but liquid filth in the boxes. There being no deodoriser put in such as ashes or lifted peat moss the smell from the closets would kill a horse, let alone a human being; & also the school itself, there does not seem to be any ventilation to the sides of the school or fresh air inlets such as lobentubes [?] to stand about 3ft above the children’s heads.
Your immediate attention to the above will oblige
Yours respectfully
G.A. Richardson.


The date is uncertain from the document, apart from '189x', but cross referencing to the east cemetery burial list, the dead child in question is
almost certainly Elizabeth Richardson aged 7 died 5th June 1895.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg richardson_letter.jpg (98.3 KB, 12 views)
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 02-10-2012, 03:45 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Nr Eglingham
Posts: 1,342
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Coquet;
The date is uncertain from the document, apart from '189x', but cross referencing to the east cemetery burial list, the dead child in question is
almost certainly Elizabeth Richardson aged 7 died 5th June 1895.
Burials have Elizabeth Richardson, aged 7, daughter of G A Richardson of Queen Street. The toilets sound choice
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 09:54 PM.


Powered by: vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.