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Old 04-05-2013, 06:30 PM
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Default Henry Hebron

I picked up two more WW1 memorial plaques for soldiers on the Broomhill/Chevington memorial the other week.

You look for years with no luck then TWO arrive the same day!!

Anyway, one of these plaques commemorates HENRY HEBRON:

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Old 04-05-2013, 06:36 PM
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Hebron is buried in Chevington Cemetery, which obviously means he was moved back to the UK and died here:

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Old 04-05-2013, 06:49 PM
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I applied for his death certificate, which shows his home address as:

of Togston Terrace, Broom Hill, by Ackllington, Northumberland,

Private in 3rd Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers

(General Labourer)



General Labourer would be his civilian occupation.
When he moved from his overseas service battalion (The 1/5th Northumberland Fusiliers according to the Commonwealth war Graves Commission) he would be transferred on paper to the 3rd (Depot) Battalion.



He died on the 16th of July 1916 in the Corporation of Middlesbrough Small Pox Hospital, Hemlington Middlesbrough.

cause of death is recorded as:

(1) Shrapnel wound to shoulder
(2) Acute Lobar Pneumonia, Acute Meningitis.
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File Type: jpg hebron2.jpg (134.3 KB, 9 views)
File Type: jpg hebron3.jpg (118.1 KB, 8 views)
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Old 04-05-2013, 07:03 PM
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Now it's the next step, finding him on the 1911 census, I'm having a little difficulty with.

Am I doing something wrong? he was 27 in 1916 so birth would be about 1889.

Can anyone find him?
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Old 06-05-2013, 10:49 AM
janwhin janwhin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coquet View Post
Now it's the next step, finding him on the 1911 census, I'm having a little difficulty with.

Am I doing something wrong? he was 27 in 1916 so birth would be about 1889.

Can anyone find him?
It looks like he is living at Hirst, 81 Pont Street, step son of John Thomas Liddle (born Radcliffe). The births of the children show a fairly mobile family....Radcliffe, Pegswood etc. He could have married a Mary Best in 1913. You might be hitting problems as Findmy Past have him as Henry Liddle in 1911.

Last edited by janwhin; 06-05-2013 at 04:29 PM. Reason: more information
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Old 06-05-2013, 02:38 PM
John@theDrift John@theDrift is offline
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I am pretty sure he was serving in the 1st/7th battalion at the outset of the war. I was in touch with his nephew Henry Hebron Liddle until recently. He was living in St Andrews, Fife, but I believe he is recently deceased. I think the Best family connection is correct too.
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Old 06-05-2013, 02:46 PM
John@theDrift John@theDrift is offline
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Default Gladstone Hardy

Also, should you ever come to sell the Gladstone Hardy plaque, could I be considered please Mike?
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Old 06-05-2013, 03:18 PM
John@theDrift John@theDrift is offline
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Yes, he definitely is listed as having sailed with the first draft of Fusiliers in April 1915 and this letter sent later that year would suggest he was still serving in the 7th in September of that year:

Sep. 18th 1915 – Alnwick Guardian
Private Robert Robinson, Togston Terrace, 7NF, in a letter written on Sunday 12th September:- “I write to let you know I am back in the trenches again. I am beside Alger Swan and Jimmy Smith.Harry Hebron has been wounded, so that only three of the north end lads remain, and we are all together. The three of us intend getting our photos taken when we get out of the trenches, so I expect you will get them put in the ‘Guardian’. I see in the ‘Guardian’ that Willie Gillon has died of wounds received near the Dardenelles. He was a fine fellow was Willie, and he could not have died a better death, fighting for his King and country. The people in England have not the least idea what war is like. They think that we lie about in the trenches, but we don’t. We have to work and hard too. We get a job finished and then the Germans put a shell into your work, and the job has to be done all over again. Before coming into the trenches, I got your writing pad and pencil all right. One of the pests out here are the gaspers, as we call them. If we had killed as many Germans as gaspers, I would have had a few thousand down. Jimmy Smith and I are in the same section, and are bomb throwers. I wish I had been standing at the corner tonight, watching the people go into the Primitive. I am just imagining I would have been doing that had I been at home. I used to do it in the past on a Sunday night, but would have liked the privilege to have gone in myself tonight. This is all the time.”
Pte. Robinson again:-
“I am still in the best of health and hope you may be the same. I hope you enjoyed the Feast, but there could not be many there because the best part of the men will be away from home. Let us hope to be back for the next Feast, with Britain and her Allies top dog. You would not think there is a war on here. They play cricket and football and shells coming over all the time. The men take little notice of them, having become used to them. I was very lucky last time I was in the trenches. Jim Smith and I were filling sandbags together, and I was knocking down some stuff of the bags. When I had got enough I sat down and I had not been down three seconds when Fritz slugged a bullet into the very place where my ‘nut’ had been. Jim said we must have that bullet, so we dug it out of the clay, and I have it as a souvenir. There was a concert on in the yard where we are billeted, and it was grand. We never think of the war when a concert or suchlike is on. I got your parcel all right and thank you for same.”
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Old 06-05-2013, 06:38 PM
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Default Hebron

Many thanks for that Janwhin / John.

I thought he was a 7th Battalion man from his number, The fact that he was wounded in 1915 might give a reason for him ending up in the 5th Battalion if he had a break in hospital then back to the front.

I don't have the casualty lists for the first part of the war, they must be with the Brigade records? (the latter years have remained with the 7th Bn. war diary in the NA)


John I still have the Gladstone Hardy plaque set aside for you.


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Old 06-05-2013, 06:50 PM
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Was Gladstone a coal miner ?

(Sorry I've misplaced your book again!)
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Old 06-05-2013, 07:38 PM
John@theDrift John@theDrift is offline
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Yes I believe so Mike
Hardy, Pte Gladstone.jpg
He is on the left in this picture
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Old 06-05-2013, 07:49 PM
John@theDrift John@theDrift is offline
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I think they were living at 78 (?) Hartside Terrace in 1911
Also living there was brother Fred who was gassed whilst serving in the 7th Battalion in WW1
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Old 06-05-2013, 09:11 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
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John was Gladstone Hardy related to Gladstone (Glad) Hardy who was married to Doreen Lillico and lived at the Drift?
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Old 06-05-2013, 09:52 PM
John@theDrift John@theDrift is offline
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Yes, Uncle Glad was the nephew of the original Gladstone killed in 1915 Janet. The brother of my great grandfather Harry Hardy who lived in the bottom house (87) at Simonside Terrace.
jscott 033.jpg
Here is a picture of their Wedding with Great-Granny and Grandad Hardy in attendance
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Old 07-05-2013, 08:10 AM
janwhin janwhin is offline
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Thanks for the photo John, I remember Doreen and Glad going out to the Bede Street Club on Saturday nights with my parents in the 1960s. Doreen was my dad's cousin, or more correctly, her father was. She was a real live wire
They also lived next door to my sister, I believe, at the Drift.
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Old 02-08-2022, 11:14 AM
lotas lotas is offline
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Default H. Hebron

Hi All,

My apologies for opening an old discussion.

I have recently been researching family history and after much searching I have discovered that I am the Great Grandson of Henry Hebron. I visited his grave for the first time a few weeks ago. I have been looking at the "Amble Company" picture and found a possible match for Henry but cannot be sure. The information posted is correct, Henry married widow Mary Jane Best (Nee Henderson), who was originally from Broom Hill, a few months prior to joining WW1, April 1915. After he died in hospital he was buried at Chevington as he had moved from Ashington to Togston Terrace when he married Mary Jane. After Henry's death Mary Jane Hebron married Andrew Liddle who was Henry's half brother, and they had a son called Henry Hebron Liddle.
I was amazed to read all of this post and especially Robert Robinson's letter that mentioned Harry and that he had been wounded.
I would be most grateful to receive any information on Henry Hebron and I appreciate its 12 years ago but is the location of Henry's Memorial Plague still known?

Thanks.
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Old 07-08-2022, 08:27 PM
John@theDrift John@theDrift is offline
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Hello lotas, thanks for your reply.
Unfortunately I couldn’t find out much about Henry Hebron, other than he was 1/7th Battalion before being wounded, then served in 1/6th after returning to the Front. Presumably he was wounded again then sent back home where he died, hence his grave in Chevington Cemetery.
I had the pleasure of corresponding with Mr HH Liddell some years ago. He was a very lovely and helpful chap and was sorry to hear of his passing some years ago. In fact, he allowed me to include him in my book on Chevington in the Second World War. I never did see a picture of Henry Hebron and would be interested if you could identify him on the picture on this site. Chances are he will be included. Bye for now, John
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  #18  
Old 12-08-2022, 10:09 AM
lotas lotas is offline
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Default Henry Hebron

Hi John,
Thanks for your reply, its greatly appreciated.
I obtained a copy of Henry H. Liddle's death cert. and it was reported by a friend so I'm assuming he didn't have any family. It looks as though H. Hebron's death plaque came onto the market possibly after a house clearance sale. (HH Liddle died 23/12/2012 and was a retired Paper Mill Chief Engineer, Coquet bought the Plaque 4/5/2013. I wonder what happened to his War Medals?)

As with all of these things I would have loved to have had 10 mins conversation with HH Liddle.

Henry Hebron was listed as being on the troop ship Invicta that reached France 21/4/1915 and he probably would have been in the "Amble Company" photograph.
Unfortunately I only have one photograph that anecdotal family evidence claimed it was a "Mr Liddle". Just to complicate things Henry Hebron often used the Liddle family name as an alias.

Best regards.
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