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Old 24-04-2014, 09:27 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
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Default Old Shilbottle Pits

I've just been revisiting some of the older threads related to the old Shilbottle pits, Bilton Banks and Longdyke. I picked up a few interesting snippets at Woodhorn today....as a bit of light relief from burials

A local chap called John Green seems to have done a few summaries:
Sturton Grange Pit (Grange):-
In 1913 Jock Young left Dunfermline for Shilbottle, he drilled a borehole at Sturton Grange and went off to war. On his return CWS had moved the place of the mine and Jock drilled another borehole on the present site. Grange mine started in 1919-1920 when the company built offices, winding engine houses, blacksmith and engineering shops. Railway sidings were carried over the dene to the north by a wooden trestle bridge to Lane End where they joined LNER. The contract to sink was then awarded to a Mr Johnston and the pit started in 1920 and went for 4 years.
Longdyke:-
Sunk 1860-1870 and abandoned on 15 August 1925. A tramway was worked by an endless rope which conveyed tubs to a siding at Alnwick gas works, coal going initially by rail to Newcastle but later to Amble and shipped. It was a steam pit and coal company built a small village to the east of the pit called BILTON BANKS 26 houses were built around 1870.
Blue Lodge Pit:-
The oldest walled pit shaft known by the author. Turn right at Shilbottle C of E school and continue down the road to 2 farm cottages, look over the wall to the east and right in front is a large spoil heap now grassed over. Capped by NCB after 1947. Date of pit 1810-1820.
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Old 12-08-2015, 09:32 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
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I've just come across a name I hadn't heard before, relating to a pit at Shilbottle and called "Lansdale Colliery". It seems to be the one referred to in the John Green article above but he calls it Blue Lodge.
Durham County Advertiser, 23 Dec 1815:
"LANSDALE COLLIERY,
To be let, for a term of 21 years, and entered upon January 1st 1817,
The old established current going colliery of Shilbottle, in the count of Northumberland, with a farm containing about 100 acres appended.
The mine is of most excellent quality, and the vend very considerable, the colliery being distant only three miles from Alnwick, and connected therewith by means of a cast iron waggon way.
The colliery may be viewed, and a plan of the workings seen, by applying to the overmen upon the premises; and Mr Tate of Bank-House will show the lands......"
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Old 13-08-2015, 08:26 AM
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Coquet Coquet is offline
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Could it be a typesetting error for Landsale (as opposed to seasale)?
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Old 13-08-2015, 08:47 AM
janwhin janwhin is offline
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I did wonder that. I had to look at it twice to make sure I wasn't getting it wrong!
The newspaper consistently uses it over two months worth of editions but that could just be repeating the original error.

Last edited by janwhin; 13-08-2015 at 08:51 AM.
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