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  #1  
Old 07-06-2013, 07:43 PM
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Default Chevington Churchyard Monumental Inscriptions

We've just about completed a transcription of the accessible St John's gravestones, about 10% are inaccessible due to vegetation:

Still needs a final error check and a dozen or so photos to add.


http://www.fusilier.co.uk/broomhill_...hurchyard.html
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Old 07-06-2013, 07:53 PM
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There's some interesting stories in there of those buried or commemorated; The adult Joycey brothers, died in the same month, one a witness in the murder trial of Craigs from Togston a few years before, the other committing suicide in Australia.

Thomas Gass, train diver crushed between his locomotive and wagons.

A forgotten Great War death, Ralph Bolton, who travelled back from Australia with the A.I.F only to die from meningitis at Salisbury in the UK before being sent to France.

Isaac Douglas Wright, crushed between his hay-cart and some steam pipes at Broomhill colliery.
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Old 07-06-2013, 11:42 PM
John@theDrift John@theDrift is offline
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Oh wow, R. Bolton is commemorated on the plaque inside the Church, I never did find out what happened to him... until now. Another mystery cleared up, thanks Coquet
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Old 08-06-2013, 12:40 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
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Brilliant piece of work, Coquet, before all the headstones are lost to the vegetation.
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Old 09-06-2013, 07:28 PM
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Quote:
Brilliant piece of work, Coquet, before all the headstones are lost to the vegetation.
I wonder what the total number of burials in the churchyard are? I would not be surprised if it's a similar scale to the Amble East Cemetery [which was a surprise]; it feels like a similar sized plot.

Quote:
R. Bolton is commemorated on the plaque inside the Church, I never did find out what happened to him... until now. Another mystery cleared up, thanks Coquet
There are the usual very well preserved set of service papers for him online with the Australian Archives. Looking at them makes me wishthe British papers had survived in better condition. Most unfortunate state of affairs that the bulk are lost forever.
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Old 10-06-2013, 10:35 AM
janwhin janwhin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coquet View Post
I wonder what the total number of burials in the churchyard are? I would not be surprised if it's a similar scale to the Amble East Cemetery [which was a surprise]; it feels like a similar sized plot.
I've got a feeling that Joan Rose, who did the Amble cemetery transcription also did one for Chevington. I'll see what I can find out. I'm not sure what date the churchyard closed and the cemetery opened at Chevington?
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Old 26-07-2013, 07:07 PM
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Janwhin's come up with the goods again and we've added an East Chevington Cemetery Burial index of over 3000 names. the first is in August 1908 and this particular data set ends in the 1980's.


We think it's just the Civil cemetery indexed here (as we would expect, ie. none from the churchyard)


Surprised to see a total lack of SIMS in there, one my ancestral lines in Chevington mid Victorian period. Guess they were all dead, moved or married out of the name by this 'modern' period.
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Old 04-09-2013, 08:55 AM
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....and we (read Janwhin ) complete this Chevington series with the Churchyard burial register:

http://www.fusilier.co.uk/broomhill_...d_burials.html
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Old 11-09-2013, 04:25 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
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When I was checking the date that burials started at St John's Chevington, I found a mention of early burials being made in the burial ground attached to the Chevington chapel, near Maidens Hall. This was closed way back in the 1800s and people were then buried at Warkworth.

I understand that the headstones and graves? were moved to St John's churchyard by the opencast operator (Crouch?). Although there should be headstones there (in the brambles ) there won't be any entries in the burial register. I wonder where those records are??
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Old 11-09-2013, 05:29 PM
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I remember we mentioned the West Chevington Chapel burial ground at the beginning of this thread too. It's visible on that map. The aerial rope-way went over the corner with a pylon next to the graveyard as well.

Then there's this link indexing a 35 page paper on the archaeological dig before the opencast got started. I don't think they moved very much unfortunately.

In the ecclesiastical arrangements of Warkworth parish the inhabitants of the chapelry were never permitted to forget that they were outsiders, for in the appropriation of seats in the parish church made under faculty in 1719 not one was given to any house, hamlet, or estate in Chevington. Not unnaturally the ratepayers frequently resisted, though they generally compromised, the demands made by the wardens for the payment of the church rate.
The chapel stood in a graveyard containing about half an acre of land, close to the homestead of Bullocks-hall. Warburton, writing about 1715, calls ` West Chevington a mean village, in which is a ruined chapel of ease.' If the tradition which ascribes the final destruction of the chapel to a fire be based on fact, it is probable that it happened about this period, for the bell of `West Schivington Chappell' was stolen by Ralph Blacklaw and George Wilson of Sandifordstone, tinkers, about Michaelmas, 1717. The middle of the graveyard is a couple of feet above the level (being evidently raised by débris), and the only stone which can now be seen is a large and heavy through-stone with bevelled edges, from which all traces of an inscription, if any ever existed, have disappeared.
The graveyard, which continued to be used for burials up to the beginning of this century, was afterwards treated, somewhat irregularly, by the vicars of Warkworth as parcel of their glebe, but it has recently been transferred by the vicar of Warkworth to the perpetual curate of Chevington.
[Hodgson 1899]
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Old 11-09-2013, 05:32 PM
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Or did the Archaeologists come back and move everything later in a second dig?


Ralph and George nicked the bell in 1717 anyway!
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Old 11-09-2013, 05:47 PM
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We need those West Chevington burials to complete our series then Janwhin.
Could they be recorded in the Warkworth registers?
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Old 12-09-2013, 02:44 PM
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Quote:
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Ralph and George nicked the bell in 1717 anyway!
Good old Ralph and George, the tinkers I wonder wher Sandifordstone was?

Further investigation required.
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Old 24-03-2014, 04:50 PM
williamtheyounger williamtheyounger is offline
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Default East Chevington Burials

Quote:
Originally Posted by Coquet View Post
Janwhin's come up with the goods again and we've added an East Chevington Cemetery Burial index of over 3000 names. the first is in August 1908 and this particular data set ends in the 1980's.


We think it's just the Civil cemetery indexed here (as we would expect, ie. none from the churchyard)


Surprised to see a total lack of SIMS in there, one my ancestral lines in Chevington mid Victorian period. Guess they were all dead, moved or married out of the name by this 'modern' period.
Out of the 3238 burials I noticed my fathers burial Albert Lawrence Young, however the plot that he was buried in was a family plot and also included my mother Jane Dodd Young in the same grave (not listed) and I believe my granny Clarke, (not listed) I also noticed from the list 28 youngs, with some related to my dad. Out of the total, (3238) did this include those burial plots with more than 1 person buried in them, or is the number a lot higher.
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Old 24-03-2014, 06:13 PM
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William, the civil cemetery lists individuals buried but only goes as far as 1980. I don't know when your mother and grnadmother died. Have you checked spelling re Clarke and also the churchyard burials?
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Old 25-03-2014, 03:28 PM
williamtheyounger williamtheyounger is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by janwhin View Post
William, the civil cemetery lists individuals buried but only goes as far as 1980. I don't know when your mother and grnadmother died. Have you checked spelling re Clarke and also the churchyard burials?
Yes thanks for that, mother died in 1995 and my grandmother died in the mid to late 50s, both are definately in the same plot, however the 1980 year is why mother is not on the list. I will check the spelling as both have been used in the past.
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  #17  
Old 26-03-2014, 02:12 PM
Vglass Vglass is offline
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Default chevington burials

I have read the posts about transcriptions of burials at Chevington but am not clear whether the Monumental inscriptions have aslo been transcribed. Please can you advise?

Val
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  #18  
Old 26-03-2014, 03:10 PM
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Coquet has taken photographs of the headstones that are accessible in Chevington churchyard. I am not aware that anyone has attempted to transcribe/photograph those headstones which are in the cemetery.
Good luck if anyone is making the attempt
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  #19  
Old 26-03-2014, 03:14 PM
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It would be quite a job, months of full time effort.
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  #20  
Old 26-03-2014, 03:20 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
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You could be taken as quite a sad person spending all your time in cemeteries Still, summer's coming.
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