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Old 07-05-2012, 02:59 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
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Default Murder at Togston Crescent

In January and February 1901 the local newspapers were reporting the death of a Margaret Craig by her husband Thomas. Thomas was a 42 years old miner who had been out and about first footing at New Year. When he got back home, drunk, he started kicking and beating his wife. She died on January 9th, apparently of heat failure brought about by shock. The jury at the inquest had wanted Thomas to be charged with murder, but following the trial he was convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to 20 years penal servitude.
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Old 08-05-2012, 07:50 PM
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That would be a shocker for such a small community.
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Old 10-06-2013, 11:18 AM
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Default New Year 1901, Togston

SHOCKING TRAGEDY AT BROOMHILL

WIFE BRUTALLY MURDERED.

Cowardly Bystander

"JUST STOOD AND WATCHED"

VERDICT WILFUL MURDER

On Friday Morning, Coroner C. Percy held an inquest at the Broomhill Hotel, Broomhill, relative to the death of Margaret Craig, who died at Togston Crescent, Broomhill, from injuries to have been inflicted by her husband, Thomas Craig who is at present under arrest.
Isabella Middlemass, stated that she resided at Togston Terrace, and identified the body viewed by the jury as that of Margaret Craig, who was about 52 years of age. On January 1st the deceased went to her house, which was about 200 yards away, at about half-past eight in the morning. She began to cry and made a complaint against her husband.


She took a shawl off her head and witness saw her hair was all down and soaked in blood. There was a wound which was bleeding very much at the left temple. There was also another wound on the left side of her head amongst the hair. That was bleeding too. Her left eye was black. There was a severe discolouration bruise on the left side of the chin.
Deceased undressed and showed witness her body. She has a severe bruise on the left shoulder, and also the left breast. There was another braise on the right leg, and another on the right thigh, and also on the right buttock, and a small bruise on the right arm. At about eleven o'clock the same morning deceased went home, but returned to witness's house about 7.30 in the evening and stayed until about ten o'clock.

The following morning deceased returned at about half past six and said she felt very ill, and would like to have a doctor. Witness sent for Dr Forster of Broomhill, at about half past eight, who attended deceased at about ten o'clock. In accordance with the doctor's directions witness bathed deceased’s head and give her medicine. Deceased remained in her house until the time of her death which took place on Wednesday afternoon, January 9th. On the Tuesday previous at deceased's request, Dr Smythe of Amble was sent for, and both doctors attended her up to the time of her death. Deceased husband never went to her house to inquire after her during the time she was with her. Mrs Craig was always quite sober when witness saw her.


Margaret Muter, a widow residing at Togston Crescent stated that on December 31st, the deceased and Thomas Craig went to her house. They went one after the other between 9 and 10 in the evening. They went away together at about eleven o'clock. He had one glass of whisky but Mrs Craig took nothing, He had had drink but was sensible. They were both friendly then and seemed to be all right. On the following morning at about 8 o'clock deceased went into her house and was in a distressed condition.


There was some blood on the right temple, but witness did not look at the wound. Blood was running freely, and she made a complaint against her husband.
The Coroner stated that as defendant was not legally represented he he could not take any conversation which took place unless defendant was present at the time. He could only take such evidence as would be accepted in a court of law.


Witness continuing said deceased remained about ten minutes and she did not see her again until the following day. Defendant; Did you not hear her pass a remark to me 'Have you been in the sun?'- No, I cannot remember, but you were quite sensible. Mrs Pearson, wife of Robert Pearson a miner, Broomhill, said that on Tuesday night, January 1st the deceased went to her house at about ten o'clock. She complained about her husband's treatment and witness saw a wound on the right temple. Deceased said she was afraid to go back to her house, and stayed with witness all night, and left again at half past six on Wednesday morning, she was quite sober at the time.


Margaret Muter recalled, stated that deceased was quite sober when she saw her. Isabella Middlemass also spoke to deceased’s sobriety.

Defendant: She couldn't be much the worse when she walked upstairs?- She walked up right enough and walked down again.

John Joycey, a miner residing at Broomhill stated at about half past five on New Years morning he was out first footing, and went to the house of Mr Forester, which was next door to Thomas Craig's. As he was coming down the stairs he heard a woman in Forester's yard shouting 'murder' She shouted several times 'murder'. and "Tom you are killing me" Witness heard several blows and a mans voice in the yard saying "You ---, "I will kill you yet, get up". He heard that distinctly. He knew Thomas Craig well, and recognised it as his voice. The woman then exclaimed - whom he recognised as Mrs Craig - "Oh Tom stop kicking me, and I'll get up and go into the house with you"

The man then said "Come on then you --, I'll take you into the house and kill you this time". Witness eased the door which led from the staircase into the yard, gently, saw Thomas Craig holding the deceased, who was then standing, by the arm, and dragged her across the yard and pushed her into his own house and followed her in. Witness heard the door locked. Deceased was crying and Mr Craig was pulling her in she was asking him to have mercy on her. Witness could not hear his reply, but he gave a curse. There was nobody with the witness at that time. Craig was kicking the deceased for about half an hour in the back yard. All the time witness was behind the door on Forster's staircase listening. The blows were continual, and deceased was appealing for mercy all the time. Witness only looked out when Craig was dragging his wife away.

The Coroner: Why didn't you go and help the woman?- I didn't go because I thought if he killed her he might bring me in as having helped to do it, so I watched and went afterwards and got witnesses.


You let him do as he liked, and then went for witnesses? - After they got into the house I heard the woman shouting ' murder' immediately so i went for witnesses then. Who did you get?- John Richardson and Richard Gray. They came back with me to the house.

Did you hear any shouts then?- No everything was quiet inside. What time was it?- A little after six then. The Coroner: Was Forster in his house? -Yes. Then why didn't you go for him? -I haven't any reasons.
I can't understand it. Here you stand watching a woman being badly used, and yet you never go upstairs even to Forster and say, "Here's a woman being killed, come with me to her assistance? - I don't know. I just stood and watched them. Was Forster sober?- Yes. Were you? - yes. Were Richardson and Gray? - no, not quite. And yet you pass Forster, who was sober, and get two men who were not. Continuing witness said on his return he knocked at the door, Craig said, "Who's there?" Witness replied "Jack Joycey", He opened the door and witness shook hands with him and wished him a happy new year.


Craig was not quite sober, but looked sensible enough, although excited. On looking across the kitchen he saw deceased standing all covered with blood, she was standing within the doorway leading into another room and crying.

The blood was running from her head and mouth, Witness said "Tom this is a dreadful New Year, what has caused this?". Craig replied "I don't know what’s done it, but I will kill the -- yet," meaning the deceased, whom he was looking at at the time. Immediately after that Craig slipped past witness, and ran at the deceased. He struck her a severe blow on the breast with his fist, and knocked her down on her back. She did not fall against anything. Deceased got up and went to witness and said, "O Jack stop him, or he will kill me!". The defendant did not say anything, but rushed at the deceased, and struck her again in the breast with his fist, and knocked her down at the bed foot. Defendant then kicked her in the bowels.


The Coroner: What and three men of you there?- He slipped by me. Deceased turned round and defendant kicked her on the right hip. The Coroner: While three valiant Englishmen were standing looking on. Witness: We then pulled him off. The Coroner: Oh, you did, did you?


Continuing, witness said defendant again shouted he would kill the --. Witness held him off her, The other two men did nothing, but told defendant to mind what he was doing. When witness got them separated, he got them both to sit down, and he asked Mr Craig how it had all happened. He replied "I do not know". Witness asked Mrs Craig, and she said her husband and Joe Grey went in and had a glass or two together. After Joseph went out she said her husband lay down on the floor against the table, and she went and lay down on the bed with all her clothes on. She never spoke to him for fear of vexing him.


All of a sudden her husband began to curse and swear at her when he was lying on the floor. He jumped up, seized the cracket, and went to the bedside and felled her with it on the head. Defendant denied it, and the wife replied " Oh yes you did, Tom, you did it?" After that she cried out for a drink. Witness asked what she would have, and she replied anything, so he give her a half of whisky. Before he did so, he asked Mr Craig it he had to give her it.

He replied "Give her what you like, but I will still kill her. Deceased was quite sober.
As the woman was drinking the whisky, witness said " Tom, you will never kill her in my presence," Deceased replied, "Well she will not live ten years in this century." Deceased asked for another drink then. She seemed like fainting and witness gave her a glass of water. She then said " Jack don't leave me, he is meant on killing me". Witness turned to Mr Craig and asked him how he thought he was standing if a policeman came. He replied, "I'm standing to be locked up", Witness said " More than that, you are standing deserving five years penal servitude, the way you have used that woman. If it comes to a Court of Law, I will be against you wherever I can. Craig then said, "Well Jack, speak the truth, whatever you do", Witness replied that he would. Witness said "Why you need not kill the woman if you want to be clear of her" to which the defendant replied, "I would give her 10s a week if I could get clear of her."

"Witness asked him not to let it happen again but defendant said "No, I will not promise you that Jack," After getting them quietened down, witness went away at half past eight. Deceased face washed washed and shawl put round her head before he left.

At this stage, Segt, McGregor produced a cracket, and defendant's boots, which were alleged to have been used against the deceased. Witness identified both of them. A Juryman: Were you afraid of Craig when you were standing behind the door? "No, not for myself, I thought he might kill the woman, and bring the blame on me. Defendant: I don't know how you could see me push her into the house from Forster's stairs?- When you dragged her out of the yard, I left Forster's stairs and followed you.


A Juryman: When you asked Mrs Craig how it began, did she say whether it was Forster's yard or her own house? - She said after he assaulted her in her own house she fled to Forster's yard. Her husband came and caught her at 6.30 a.m. on January 1st Joycey went to him and Richardson and told them something about Thomas Graigs. They went to the house together, and Joycey knocked at the door, Witness could not say he was sober. He had been first-footing all night. Craig opened the door and they went in. The first thing he saw was Craig rushing at Mrs Craig. He struck her and knocked her down. When she got up again deceased wanted to go out, as she was afraid of Mr Craig. Defendant would not let her out, but about 20 minutes after she made her escape. That was all he saw.

The Coroner: Can you remember her being Knocked down near the bed? - No. Were you very drunk?- I was drunk. Can you remember what Craig said?- No all I remember is what Joycey said about how Craig would be standing if the police came. Craig said something about standing the consequences.

Coroner: Can you remember anything about Craig saying he would kill her? - No, I never heard that. Mrs Craig said twice, "Don't go away until daylight or he will kill me". What did Craig say to that?- Nothing. I thought he was mad drunk. What made you think that. He was sitting quietly in a chai according to your story. - he made one or two rushes at her when she was trying to get out. I never heard him say anything. You only have hazy idea of what took place. John Richardson, a coal miner at Broomhill also gave evidence. He went to the house with the last two witnesses. He was detained at the door way and when he went in Mrs Craig was on her knees between the kitchen and another room. Witness saw no blows struck. Mrs Craig was bleeding from the face and neck, and there was a big patch of blood on her apron. She said, " He will kill me tonight".

Mr Craig wanted her to get into the front room out of their sight. If she did not go he said he would knock her in. Witness tried to persuade him to leave his wife alone. He did not hear Craig threaten to take his wife's life.
Witness told defendant if he wouldn't be any better he would go to the police. Craig said he could go. Witness went to the door and Craig followed him to the kitchen door, where they had a few words, and then witness went home.


Joseph Crisp, a neighbour, stated that early in the morning of 1st January he heard voices between two ans three o'clock. Just about that time someone came into his yard and tried the door. Witness fell asleep, and sometimes afterwards he heard shuffling outside, and the gasping noise which some men give when they are striking a blow. Directly afterwards he heard voices outside, the people seeming to get admittance to Craig. In the afternoon of the same day he heard voices in Craig house as though he were breaking something up. Witness asked him to be a little quieter as there was someone bad. Afterwards defendant broke his window. Craig had had drink but was sensible.


Dr Forster stated that he was called to see Mrs Craig at Mrs Middlemass's house on the Jan. 2nd. Witness examined her and found the bruises and wounds spoken of by the first witness. The contusion on the breast would be about six inches across.

The one on the left leg was about ten inches long, extending from the ankle to the calf, She complained of her husband's treatment. She was not suffering seriously from shock at this time. He ordered the wounds to be bathed. Witness attended her every day until Monday following. On Tuesday she had a severe vomiting of bile. On Wednesday she was gradually sinking and died. Sergt McGregor went to him and asked if the woman was in danger of her life. Witness replied that he hoped she would come round, but as soon as there was any danger he (witness) would let him know.

On Tuesday he considered her in danger during the afternoon, but he sent no message to the sergeant. Witness thought he told P.C. Hills about the woman being in danger. The Coroner: It is an exceedingly regrettable thing when as in this case, a man may or may not be put upon his trial for life. It possible you know doctor for a person to make a declaration on their deathbed.
Continuing witness said in his opinion deceased died from syncope caused by great nervous shock the result of injuries.
Defendant: The doctor has attended her for some time and warned her about "possing". He said she had a weak heart. The Coroner: Did you find it so at the post morterm? - I found it normal.

Dr Smythe stated on Tuesday, Jan 8th, he was called to see deceased at about midday. He examined the woman at that time. and found the wounds and bruises spoken of on the front of the body. The deceased was too ill to be moved then, and he could not examine her back. After death he found both buttocks bruised, and a bruise about three inches in diameter on the middle of the back, and a large bruise between the shoulders. There was another extending from the back of the neck to the scalp, and another bruise from both sides, extending to the back.


Generally the woman was simply a mass of bruises. The injuries, in his opinion, must have been caused by blows or kicks. He considered the woman in danger when he saw her. She was suffering severely from shock. On Jan. 10th he made a post mortem examination of the body and found beyond the external wounds and bruises already mentioned, the spleen enlarged and the liver and kidneys affected. None of these were in any way sufficient to cause death. In his opinion death was due to shock, the direct result of the injuries received. By a juryman: She being a stout woman the bruise on the arm may have been caused by a strong grip.

Defendant: Don't you think that a very slight blow caused these bruises, her being so fat? - No. Not to that extent.

Sgt. McGregor, stationed at Amble, stated that he apprehended Thomas Craig on Tuesday night, Jan 8th at about eleven o'clock. and cautioned him. He then charged him with wounding the deceased with intent to do grievous bodily harm, at Broomhill.


He replied "Yes I must have used her badly. It is all this accursed drink." On the way to the police station, defendant said “I have offered her 10s a week in my sober senses to go away for fear of this happening". He was sober when apprehended.

Supt. Miller, Alnwick, stated that on Wednesday Jan 9th he charged the prisoner with causing the death of his wife, by violently kicking her and striking her with a stool. He replied "I never thought it would come to that. I know nothing about it. It was just through drink. We never agreed extra well".

The Coroner, in summing up said that he need scarcely tell the jury that their verdict must be given upon the evidence which had been laid before them that day. They had to put from their minds, any memories of friendly acquaintance with the prisoner, or any feeling of ill will.

He need say nothing of what they thought of the man Joycey, who stood half an hour watching the proceedings in the backyard, without calling the man Forster, who had been mentioned, and who was just upstairs to assist a poor woman who was being done to death.

It was a cowardly behaviour, which made every Englishman indignant. But whatever they might think of his actions, they had his story of what took place that night. He had given it in a straight forward manner, without any hesitancy. His evidence was borne out to a great extent by the medical testimony. It was not necessary to point out the law did not look upon drink as any plea or extenuating circumstance for a crime committed. When a person was killed the law presumed malice against the person who did the crime, and it was for that person to show great provocation or extenuating circumstances to have the charge of murder reduced to one of manslaughter. In the present case, although it was with sorrow he said it, he was afraid there was no evidence of such provocation.


The jury considered their verdict in private. Upon returning the foreman stated that the jury had unanimously agreed to a verdict of wilful murder against Thomas Craig, but if possible recommended him to mercy. The Coroner stated that he would endeavour to bring that recommendation before the proper authorities, but it was really a matter which the judge alone would have to deal with. The man Craig was permitted to see a few of his friends and relatives for a while, after which he was conveyed back to Alnwick.

[Shields Daily Gazette 12th January 1901]
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Old 10-06-2013, 11:19 AM
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real nasty stuff.
Coroner didn't think much of poor John Joycey.
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Old 11-06-2013, 11:00 AM
janwhin janwhin is offline
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I wonder if he escaped the hangman's noose?
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Old 11-06-2013, 02:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by janwhin View Post
I wonder if he escaped the hangman's noose?
I think he did. Below states 20 year penal servitude. But .. how long did he serve and did he make it back out??

[It looks like the surname spelling is 'Craig' rather than 'Craigs' - that article on the coroner's inquest used both spellings, I have done a word change to keep them all the same as 'Craig'.]
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Old 11-06-2013, 02:34 PM
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Looks like he had a previous conviction for assaulting a police officer. I think he was lucky to get the manslaughter sentence, it saved his life.
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Old 12-06-2013, 10:22 AM
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Originally Posted by janwhin View Post
the inquest had wanted Thomas to be charged with murder, but following the trial he was convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to 20 years penal servitude.
It looks like I had already answered my own question last year. Must be past my sell by date
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Old 14-11-2013, 02:32 PM
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Does anyone know where the lady is buried?
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Old 14-11-2013, 07:46 PM
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It looks like she's in Chevington churchyard, certainly there's a Margaret Craig in there aged 52. (On the sister site).

With it being Togston I thought she might have gone to Amble cemetery but she's not there.
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Old 14-11-2013, 09:50 PM
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Is that the old or new one?

Do you know what became of Thomas after he served his sentence?
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Old 14-11-2013, 10:44 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
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It's the old one by the church, "churchyard" as opposed to "cemetery" if you look at the sister site.

I don't know what happened to the husband....if he survived prison I guess it would be the 1920s and he would be well into his 60s. I don't think they were local to Togston.
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Old 16-11-2013, 03:33 PM
Wesley29 Wesley29 is offline
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Where did he serve his time?
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Old 16-11-2013, 04:54 PM
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I've no idea, most likely Durham at a guess.
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Old 16-11-2013, 06:40 PM
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On the 1901 census there is only one "Thomas Craig" in prison, with his age (+ or - one year). His trade is Coal miner hewer. Born "Ireland"

He is in Stafford Prison.


Fast forward to 1911

Again one only " Thomas Craig" born 1859 (+ or - 1 year), born Ireland (Newbliss) but this time his occupation is Shoemaker. His Marital status is 'Widower'

This time he is in Portland Convict Prison, Weymouth.

I suppose the question is did the prisons retrain inmates in other trades which could result in the change of occupation?

And...

I've been looking in the newspaper archive again for this guy and in the Morpeth Herald of the 17th May 1890 there is a Thomas Craig in a cerfuffle with a cop after being drunk and disorderly, and his wife is called Margaret. Now from the document above recording his conviction in 1901 a reference is made to assaulting a police officer about 1899/1900
But On reading the article it is actually Thomas Craig that is suing the police officer for damages, and it is much earlier than his referenced assault conviction above.

What happened in that case is that the Policeman followed the drunk Craig home, entered his house and smacked him over the head with his truncheon (Blood squirting everywhere) Craig sues for damages and wins. Although he did hit the Policeman as well!

Now if this is the same Thomas Craig it gets interesting, because in this case Craig says the reason for going a bit loopy with drink is that he served in the Zulu and Boer Wars and got a clonk on the head, which causes his bizarre behaviour when drinking.

Last edited by Coquet; 17-11-2013 at 11:13 AM. Reason: edited for clarity [some chance!]
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Old 16-11-2013, 06:45 PM
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I should add the Boer War Craig refers to is the First Boer War, you will not have heard much about that because it was a disaster for the British (No Medals )


Perhaps Craig was at Majuba Hill

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Majuba_Hill
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Old 16-11-2013, 07:07 PM
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The incident with the policeman was at Stakeford where this Thomas and Margaret Craig lived.

They are on the 1891 census in Bothal Demesne..........and census Thomas is born....... Ireland.

I think this is all the same man.

He should be on the Zulu War medal roll as well.
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Old 16-11-2013, 10:49 PM
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There was another Thomas and Margaret Craig. Apparently they were living at Cowpen at the time of the trial and because they had previously lived at Broomhill they got a lot of grief from the neighbours and had to move.

Nice detective work by the way Coquet. Thomas Craig was Irish and the dearly departed was from Yorkshire.
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Old 17-11-2013, 11:02 AM
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So do you think this is the same man being assaulted by the police in 1890 as our Togson killer? His wife appears to be born in Goole. No children.

I cannot find any reference in the papers to his later drunk and disorderly charge and assaulting a police officer in the 1899-1900 period. [the other offences recorded on his manslaughter conviction] I bet these offences were here at Broomhill and are recorded in the Alnwick Gazette which is not on line yet.
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Old 17-11-2013, 03:14 PM
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I'm not sure it is the same man. I think the police assault took place at Choppington/Guide Post and there is a death notice of 1908 for a Thomas Craig husband of Margaret at Choppington, aged 70.

A birth of about 1840 would mean he would have been about 40 in the Zulu War and 50? for the first Boer.
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