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  #1  
Old 09-06-2014, 07:57 PM
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Default Radcliffe Colliery

Here is a mid Victorian engraving of Radcliffe Colliery. From an original colliery invoice. I wondered how stylised this is, after seeing the unlikely winding equipment on the left. But....after investigating this I think the structure on the left is a counterbalance affair to the main winding equipment. this was generally some heavy chain attached to a winding rope connecting to the main winding drum. this 'weight chain' had its own shaft which it dropped down during winding operations. I have a picture of Wearmouth Colliery with the same type of affair which was built in 1848 - close enough to the date of Radcliffe to be using similar equipment?
Interesting anyway. Warkworth Castle also on the right?








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Old 09-06-2014, 08:01 PM
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Compare that with Wearmouth, counterbalance on the left again:

you can actually see chain near ground level attached to the winding rope.
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Old 09-06-2014, 08:08 PM
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On that Radcliffe engraving there appears to be a horse gin?? What's that all about? Something salvaged from Percy Street Colliery?
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Old 09-06-2014, 09:50 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
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I like the man on the right with his pick and his dog, strolling to his shift as part of some rural idyll.
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Old 09-06-2014, 09:58 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coquet View Post
On that Radcliffe engraving there appears to be a horse gin?? What's that all about? Something salvaged from Percy Street Colliery?
Funny you should say that. I've come across a death at Eshott Colliery in 1864 which describes how the coals are brought to bank by a one horse gin with two ropes, north and south, the one rope ascending as the other is going down. The ropes were 4 1/2 inches. The men used the ropes to get to the surface.
I'll be sending you this one and a Debdon fatality for the mining deaths.
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  #6  
Old 10-06-2014, 08:38 AM
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They look a potentially lethal mode of transport that's for sure:

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Old 10-06-2014, 08:54 AM
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That one at Radcliffe could be a leftover from the shaft sinking, or just there for emergency use if the steam engine broke down with men underground.
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Old 10-06-2014, 10:31 AM
janwhin janwhin is offline
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At least in the diagram they're being lifted in a corve. Shilbottle and Eshott you hung on to the looped rope
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Old 10-06-2014, 07:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by janwhin View Post
At least in the diagram they're being lifted in a corve. Shilbottle and Eshott you hung on to the looped rope
Yep, looks like from those reports you've sent me there was nothing that posh for round here, more like the image at the bottom of this page: indeed!



http://www.ncl.ac.uk/library/service...g/children.php
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Old 23-10-2014, 10:39 AM
geoffglass geoffglass is offline
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Default Radcliffe

Quote:
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On that Radcliffe engraving there appears to be a horse gin?? What's that all about? Something salvaged from Percy Street Colliery?
Just joined group and noticed a
Percy Street Pit mentioned
What /where etc.
I was born and lived in Amble
1945-1966 and never heard this mentioned
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  #11  
Old 23-10-2014, 06:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geoffglass View Post
Just joined group and noticed a
Percy Street Pit mentioned
What /where etc.
I was born and lived in Amble
1945-1966 and never heard this mentioned
The Percy Street workings had been forgotten (just about) by 1876, even though they were being used for a water supply at that time. So we are talking early here, probably 18th century.

Post 12 and 19 in this thread on Amble's early water supply refer to the workings. Coal was extracted for use at the Links salt works.
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Old 24-10-2014, 10:35 AM
geoffglass geoffglass is offline
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Default Percy street pit

Thanks Coquet
Lived in 1a Percy street for a few years all this banter brings back wonderful memories
We lived above the Bradford bros
First house over the railway line
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  #13  
Old 24-10-2014, 10:42 AM
janwhin janwhin is offline
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You'll have some good memories of the trains and wagons shunting back and forth then Used to walk over the crossing every day to get to Dovecote Street school.
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Old 24-10-2014, 07:00 PM
Alan J. Alan J. is offline
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geofglass, I remember you on the supplies in the West side of the Brockwell with the McLouds and Bill Elliott among others, Alan J.( electrician with your uncle Sid)
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Old 25-10-2014, 02:37 PM
geoffglass geoffglass is offline
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Default Hauxley

Hi Alan
What a wonderful thing memories I remember you well and the others you mention
Our mothers were very good friends and if memory serves you lived in Church Street
Sid still going strong but haven't seen him for a while as I don't visit Amble as
much as I used too
Hope you are keeping well and look forward to chin wagging
Geoff
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Old 25-10-2014, 02:49 PM
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Default Over the railway

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You'll have some good memories of the trains and wagons shunting back and forth then Used to walk over the crossing every day to get to Dovecote Street school.
Yes got some tales to tell about living there
My brother& sister both still live in Amble but I don't visit that much now
that my parents died
We keep in touch by email phone or Facebook now once I know how the site works I will post some of my tales
Regards Geoff Glass
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  #17  
Old 28-11-2014, 07:43 PM
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Gazette 29/7/1916

Radcliffe.
Death of a Radcliffe Standard.-The death of Mr John Sinclair, which took place at his residence at Radcliffe Colliery on Thursday last week, has removed one of Radcliffe's best-known men. He has been of indifferent health of late, but his death came somewhat suddenly at the last. Thirty-seven years ago Mr Sinclair left Widdrington and came to Radcliffe colliery, and started there as a coal hewer, and shortly after he was promoted to the position of deputy overman. He had not occupied this position long, when he was still further advanced to that of back overman, and again later took up the official position of fore overman at Newburgh Colliery. He held this position right up to the time of his retirement, which took place about two years ago. He was a thoroughly practical pit man having gone through every grade of pit work. The owners of the colliery had always the fullest confidence in him as an official, and he had the double satisfaction of doing his duty faithfully and well for both masters and men. He was highly respected and esteemed throughout the district especially so by the workmen amongst whom he had laboured for so many years. This was fully evidenced by the large number of miners who followed his last mortal remains to the place of internment at Amble East Cemetery.

The funeral took place on Sunday afternoon and was attended by a large number of friends and acquaintances, who mourn the loss of an old and true friend. The burial service was conducted by the Rev. J. Trehair Wilkins, Pastor of the Amble Congregational church. Mr Sinclair leaves a widow, a son, and two daughters, with whom everyone sympathises in their sad bereavement. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Messrs. Ballantyne and son, Amble.
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Old 19-05-2017, 10:18 AM
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In a recent family conversation about my grandparents and great grandparents homes in Cross Row West and Long Row North respectively I remembered playing in the gardens near the 'Tute and in the 'square'. I seem to remember an old shaft / drift that was fenced off and had a steel gate over it in the square (in red on the attached map) Am I mistaken? If not, does anyone else remember it?
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  #19  
Old 19-05-2017, 11:14 AM
Alan J. Alan J. is offline
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There was a drift in the area bordered by Centre Row and Leslie Row this was part of Broomhill Colliery and operated until the early 50's.
As far as I remember the area you have marked was used by Albert and Jimmy Douglas to keep poultry and pigs they also had a couple of ponies with flat carts and did a bit of local haulage in their spare time, they both worked at Hauxley.
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Old 24-05-2017, 05:31 PM
jumpy shore jumpy shore is offline
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Thanks Alan, thats what I must be thinking of. Its probably 50 years ago so my was memory as 7 year old! I remember the pigs and chickens and chasing them, a more vivid memory is what seemed to be hundreds rolls of Lino in the store!
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