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  #21  
Old 03-02-2012, 08:07 PM
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Longdyke farm / cottages does appear to have survived more or less complete (spelling: "Longdike" on the map)
Assume now all converted to housing??
Looks like quite a nice spot anyway:

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  #22  
Old 04-02-2012, 10:51 AM
Alan J. Alan J. is offline
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Default Longdyke Colliery.

There was an endless rope haulage system from the pit to the gas works at Alnwick. It went through the Cawledges somehow, possibly using bridges to negotiate the terrain. This info came from a person who had worked there, apparently the Alnwick men used this route as the best way to walk to work at Longdyke.
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Old 05-02-2012, 12:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan J. View Post
There was an endless rope haulage system from the pit to the gas works at Alnwick. It went through the Cawledges somehow, possibly using bridges to negotiate the terrain. This info came from a person who had worked there, apparently the Alnwick men used this route as the best way to walk to work at Longdyke.

Interesting. Yes there must have been a bridge across the Cawledge Burn.

Do you know anything about Old Shilbottle Colliery, that is the one even before longdyke? its at about lat/long 55.380439, -1.6884533 the green arrow on here:


http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?q=55.3...gl=uk&t=h&z=15


Bizarre thing about this pit is that the shaft is still shown on the most recent OS Maps, as if it's still there. if you zoom in on that map it (the shaft) should be a few metres to the west of the parked car. I recon it's 1,150 metres from the Longdyke shafts.
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Old 05-02-2012, 12:24 PM
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Regarding that Longdyke tramway; it does a sharp turn to due North just south of the Cawledge burn valley (or valley of a tributary feeding in to it). At that point on the track is another large building, I assume a second hauler and they must have changed the tub sets over there??

you can see most of the track-way from longdyke to Alnwick here: the sharp turn is where the green arrow is:


http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?q=55.3...gl=uk&t=h&z=15


Interesting to see if any remnants of the bridge survive in that area.
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  #25  
Old 05-02-2012, 12:38 PM
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Default Old colliery shaft.

That shaft was there to within the last 20 or so years, right at the corner known as "The Keepers", it had a stone wall aroud it about 6 or 7 feet high. I believe there was also a cottage near to the site as well up to the 1930's.
There were several pits in the Shilbottle area from time to time, my ancestors lived and worked there in the 1830's/40's and were described on the census returns as "Pitmen".
My Great grandfather, born 1848, moved around for work and eventually ended up at North Broomhill having been in the Bedlington area and Pegswood before that all presumably to find and retain employment. When he died in 1907, at Broomhill he was a deputy overman at Broomhill colliery.His father came from Hobberlaw on Alnwick moor where there was a pit too.
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Old 06-02-2012, 10:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan J. View Post
That shaft was there to within the last 20 or so years, right at the corner known as "The Keepers", it had a stone wall aroud it about 6 or 7 feet high. I believe there was also a cottage near to the site as well up to the 1930's.
There were several pits in the Shilbottle area from time to time, my ancestors lived and worked there in the 1830's/40's and were described on the census returns as "Pitmen".
My Great grandfather, born 1848, moved around for work and eventually ended up at North Broomhill having been in the Bedlington area and Pegswood before that all presumably to find and retain employment. When he died in 1907, at Broomhill he was a deputy overman at Broomhill colliery.His father came from Hobberlaw on Alnwick moor where there was a pit too.
"Keeper's Pit" sounds familiar. So a "walled up" shaft like Longdyke mentioned above. These would become the responsibility of the Coal Authority I assume? They must have had a blitz on open shafts and filled them all in. I'm actually surprised these oldies were still open even if it was 20 years ago. Dangerous places -blackdamp seepage in particular.
By 1911 my great-grandfather was a Deputy Overman too; I'm not certain which pit but Broomhill is most likely as he lived in Amble. He died in 1939
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  #27  
Old 11-02-2012, 03:35 PM
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A few snippets thar ref Shilbottle Colliery:



Jan 7th 1815: Four [miners] killed by Choak damp [sic] at Shilbottle Colliery (The Leeds Mercury Saturday, January 20, 1816 in a list of the previous year’s ‘remarkable events’)


The Lessees of Shilbottle Colliery have humanely distributed 26 loads of coal among the poor of that place. (The Newcastle Courant, Saturday, January 22, 1825)


The Lessees of Shilbottle Colliery, with their usual humane and benevolent feelings, have given each poor family of Shilbottle a load of coals. (The Newcastle Courant, Saturday, February 11, 1826)



To be sold by private contract, All that valuable Freehold Estate, situated at Shilbottle, in the county of Northumberland, containing 267 acres of arable and pasture land, be the same more or less; together with the seams of coal and limestone within and under the infield lands, part of the said premises, containing about 95 acres, in the Town of Shilbottle aforesaid, and other parts nearby adjoining thereto; a considerable portion of which Coal lies very near to the present workings of Shilbottle Colliery. Also the freehold corn tythes, arising and growing yearly out of lands in the said township, occupied by Messrs Tate, Marshall, Wright, Rochester, Taylor, and Jameson, containing in the Whole about 600 Acres.
The estates and tythes are in the Tenure of Messrs. Wrigglesworth, under and agreement for a lease of 12 years from the 12th day of May next, at the annual Rent of £215. It is well watered and fenced, with good Farm House and two Farm Offices thereon. The estate is about half a mile from the Great Post Road to London, three miles from the Market town of Alnwick, and about the same Distance from the Shipping port of Alemouth [Alnmouth] The Land-tax is redeemed, the Tenants pay all taxes chargeable thereon, over or above the said rent, except a Fee-farm rent of £1 1s 8d. payable annually to Francis Pym, Esq. by the landlord. On application the Tenants will shew the estate, and for further information apply to Mr Russell, of Alnwick. Shilbottle, 7th February, 1827. The Newcastle Courant, Saturday, February 10, 1827

(The Lessees of Shilbottle Colliery in 1829 are recorded as “Messrs Taylor” )



The Lessees of Shilbottle Colliery have generously given each poor family of Shilbottle a load of coals (The Newcastle Courant, Saturday, January 19, 1828)



The Owners of Shilbottle Colliery have generously given each poor family of Shilbottle and the neighbourhood a load of coals (The Newcastle Courant, Saturday, February 14, 1829)



COAL WORKMEN. A few steady Hewers and Putters, who can work a 30-inch seam, will meet with encouragement by applying at Shilbottle Colliery near Alnwick. July 24 1838. (The Newcastle Courant, Friday, July 27, 1838)



Justice Room, in Alnwick, 27th August – Luke Weatheritt and James Jeffery, two of the bound pitmen of Shilbottle Colliery, were convicted for absenting themselves from their service, and were sentenced to six weeks hard labour in the House of Correction at Morpeth. On the day they so absented themselves, the whole of the men of the colliery, by some combination, struck work, and laid off the pit. (The Northern Liberator, Saturday, August 31, 1839)


[Radcliffe tragedy below but an ex Shilbottle miner]

Coroners Inquests: On Saturday, the 12th inst., another inquest was held before the same coroner, at Radcliffe Terrace, near Warkworth, on the body of Henry Corbitt, pitman, aged 32, who was working in Radcliffe Colliery the day before, and a large stone falling from the roof of the pit hit the deceased on the back of the head, and killed him on the spot. He had been employed there about two years, and formerly worked at Shilbottle Colliery, near Alnwick. The deceased has left a widow and five children to mourn his loss. Verdict – “Accidental Death” (The Newcastle Courant, Friday, February 18, 1848)




DIED FROM EXPOSURE TO COLD.—On Monday, an inquest was held at the house of Mr Robert Brown, innkeeper, Shilbottle, near Alnwick, before Mr J. J. Hardy, coroner, on the body of Edward Bannester, 57 years of age, sawyer, belonging to Alnwick, who had been found lying dying that morning, in front of the engine-house fire at Shilbottle Colliery. On the day preceding deceased had been engaged by Mr George Trueman to bring a cow from a village, about nine miles to the north of Alnwick, to Shilbottle, which is about three miles to the south, and he would appear to have partaken rather freely of refreshment, as at seven o'clock in the evening, Mr Trueman found he had reached no further than Alnwick. At the above hour deceased left Alnwick again on his road to Shilbottle with the cow. About eleven o'clock the same evening, Mr Truman was driving home in a spring-cart, and overtook the cow on the road, but without the deceased. He took the cow to the Royal Oak Inn, and, in company with other two men, again proceeded on his journey. They had gong about two miles, when they discovered [the] deceased lying by the side of the road tipsy, and they took him into the cart, and drove to the colliery. Mr Trueman asked deceased to go to Shilbottle, and he would give him a bed, but deceased said he could stop at the colliery; and with the assistance of the two men got out of the cart, and went and lay down in front of the engine door, which is protected by an open archway. The parties then shook hands, and separated. Oswald Gibson, engineman, on his coining to his work next morning, found deceased lying "curled" up, as if from cold; he spoke to deceased, but received no reply, and lifted him up, but ho appeared to be unable to speak, and expired in a few minutes. Verdict—" Died from exposure to cold while under the influence of drink.' (The Newcastle Courant, Friday, March 31, 1865)





SHILBOTTLE COLLIERY…..MR. CHARLES BROUGH,….WILL SELL BY AUCTION,
At the Queen's Head Hotel, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, on Tuesday, 21st December, at two o'clock precisely,
ALL THAT VALUABLE AND CURRENT GOING, COLLIERY, called SHILBOTTLE COLLIERY, in the County of Northumberland, about Three Miles from Alnwick, comprising a considerable Area of the celebrated Shilbottle Seam of Coal, together with the Colliery Plant, Agents' and Workmen's Houses, and all other Erections and Buildings belonging thereto. The Colliery is within Three Miles of the North Eastern Railway. Further Particulars may be obtained at the Offices of the AUCTIONEER, Blackett Street ; of Messrs. T. E. FORSTER & CO., Mining Engineers ; and of Messrs. LAWS, GLYNN and MAYSON, Solicitors, 7, Collingwood Street, Newcastle-upon-Tyne. Blackett Street, December 7th.
(The Newcastle Courant, Friday, December 17, 1869)




FALL IN THE PRICE OF COALS-The lessees of Shilbottle Colliery, on Monday reduced the price of theire coals 3s 4d per ton, which are now selling at 21s 8d. The coals at the new pit on Alnwick Moor were lately reduced, and are now selling at 16s 8d a ton, with a good steady demand. (The Newcastle Courant, Friday, August 29, 1873)
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Old 11-02-2012, 03:47 PM
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Looks like Longdyke was causing some serious pollution down at Alnmouth, resulting in Iron overdoses!

Alnmouth Water Supply.—
At the ordinary meeting of Alnwick Rural District Council on Monday, Mr T. H. Jobling presiding, the Inspector reported that he and the Medical Officer (Dr Scott Purves) had been investigating the conditions causing the contamination of the Alnmouth water supply. They found the supply above a pit heap perfectly clear, while below the pit heap and in Alnmouth the water was yellow. Excavations had been commenced to ascertain whether any surface water fouled by the pit heap had found its way down to the new iron pipe, and had flowed along it to where the main was composed of sanitary pipes.---The Medical Officer, in his report, remarked that if the Council did not take some strong measures- to prevent the waste of water at the colliery stand pipe the people of Alnmouth were not likely to get much water, contaminated or otherwise, from the old supply.---Mr Wm. Robertson said the contamination of the water supply was now becoming a very serious matter for the people of Alnmouth, there being so many cases of illness amongst them which was attributable to the water. One gentleman who had consulted a doctor was told that he had been overdosed with iron.—Orders were given to the inspector to proceed with the greatest energy towards effecting a remedy, and it was also agreed that the clerk write to the owners of Shilbottle Colliery asking them to avoid placing a pit heap on the line of pipes, and also to endeavour to prevent the waste of water complained of.—it was resolved that application be made to the Local Government Board for sanction to borrow from the Public Works Loan Commissioners a sum of £1,500 for increasing Alnmouth water supply by bringing the Snab Leazes springs.



The Newcastle Weekly Courant, Saturday, October 28, 1899
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  #29  
Old 11-02-2012, 04:13 PM
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Default Shilbottle Miner Murdered 1874

MURDER AT ALNWICK.
The usually quiet town of Alnwick; where crimes of a serious character are exceedingly rare, was startled on Saturday night by the report that a man had been murdered. The facts are these :—James Wilson, aged 21, of Bebside Colliery, near Bedlington, and who had just joined the Northumberland Militia as a recruit, was drinking in the FIeece Inn, Bondgate Without, Alnwick, on Saturday night, with William Buglass, aged 38, a pitman at Shilbottle Colliery, near Alnwick, and others. A companion of Wilson had a knife in his hand, and was cutting a cane. Wilson asked for it, and it was given to him. Some altercation seems to have been going on, and Wilson said that if anyone interfered with him he would put that (the knife) into him that night. Upon this he began in a threatening, though somewhat jocular way, as it was understood, to point the implement towards some persons present, and among others to Buglass. " I've given him a bit of a ‘prog’ in his jacket," Wilson said, and Buglass exclaimed, "I'm stabbed." The latter was induced to go out and see a doctor, but when he got as far as between Bondgate Tower and the White Swan he dropped on the flagging, and was carried into Dr. Candlish's surgery, where he died about twenty minutes after the act. Both were, it is alleged, the worse of drink, but no provocation, it is stated, was given by Buglass. Wilson was immediately apprehended by Mr Tait, one of the Alnwick constabulary force, and was taken to the lock-up. Buglass: has left a wife and 6 chïldren.

TEE PRISONER BEFORE THE MAGISTRATES.
The prisoner, James Wilson, was brought before H. Lisle, Esq., J.P., at the Court House, Alnwick, on Monday forenoon, and was remanded till Saturday. The knife which he threw away shortly after stabbing Buglass was found on Sunday evening, in the ground behind the offices of Mr W. T. Hindmarsh, solicitor, by P.C. Tait.

THE CORONER'S INQUEST.
An inquest was held on the body of William Buglass, before Mr T. D. Smith, coroner, at the Queen's Head Inn, on Monday afternoon, when James Buglass said : I am a miner, and live at Shilbottle. I identify the body which the jury have just viewed as that of my brother, William Buglass. He was a miner, and 38 years of age. He was a particularly quiet, inoffensive man.—Thomas Snowdon said: I am fireman at Bebside Colliery. I came here with James Wilson on Saturday to join the Northumberland Militia, which Wilson had himself joined three weeks since. I have not done so yet, as the doctor was not at home. On Saturday night we were at the Fleece Inn. I went there with Buglass, whom I first saw and got acquainted with that day, when I was with Wilson in some of the public houses of the town. I don't know which. Buglass told me that he and Wilson were well acquainted. Wilson was down at Shilbottle Races in August last, and stopped at Buglass's house until the week's end. When we went into the Fleece Inn, three or four men were in the room.
When Wilson came in all was peace and quietness. Two men belonging to the town had a fight, but neither Wilson nor Buglass had anything to do with it. One of the men who were fighting was called Taylor. Buglass was not quarrelling with anybody, and both Wilson and he were sitting quietly in the room when I went out to the back door. I was out about five minutes, and when I came back Buglass had been stabbed. They told me he was stabbed, and said, "James Wilson had done it." Wilson was standing, in the middle of the floor, and he did not deny it. Buglass and Wilson were the only ones he knew. Taylor had then left; he had left before I quitted the room. I saw a knife in James Wilson's hand before I went out. We each had a cane stick, and he was cutting that before I went out, but he was not flourishing it about when I was in. I was in Wilson's company till he was taken. We remained in the house five or ten minutes after Buglass was taken away. The knife belonged to me ; he had asked me for the loan of it. He got it from me about two minutes before I went out of the room. He kept it himself, and after he left the house he throw it away. He came out to look and see where they had taken Buglass to. He changed his mind, and when he threw away the knife he was making his way to catch the train. I persuaded him to come back over again, to see if we could see or hear anything of Buglass. I had intended to go home that night, but I bad not seen the doctor, and therefore intended to stay a day. When we came to the Tower we met a policeman, and a man in plain clothes, and the policeman said that Buglass was dead. The officer took Wilson into custody. From the time I heard Buglass had been stabbed till the time we met the policeman, half-an-hour had not elapsed. Wilson was not sober, Neither he nor Buglass was exactly sober. The knife produced is the knife Wilson used.
(The blade was 3 1/2 inches in length). I was present when it was found yesterday by P.C. Tait. I asked Wilson why he had done it. He said " he could not tell; he had no intention of doing it." This was be- fore he heard that Buglass was dead. When we came to the Fleece Wilson left our company to seek lodgings. Buglass was going to seek us lodgings in the town. He put the knife in his pocket directly after he got it from me in the Fleece. He was generally very peaceful in disposition.—The Coroner read a note from Dr. Candlish (who had made a post mortem examination) stating that Buglass had "died from a sharp puncture in the right ventricle of the heart."—The inquest was adjourned.


The Newcastle Courant, Friday, April 3, 1874
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  #30  
Old 15-02-2012, 03:51 PM
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Default Old Shilbottle Colliery Longdyke Waggonway.

Had a walk along the old waggon-way from the Alnwick end and took some snaps. Some traces left. (It is a public footpath for more than half its length)

I won't post too many and bore you

The end near Alnwick:

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Old 15-02-2012, 04:01 PM
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No traces of any bridge in the Cawledge burn valley proper, but in the valley of the next burn nearer to the collery site, there are the remains of a stone built structure with two threaded solid steel rods, (inch or two in diameter) which possibly supported some wooden structure over the burn. the waggonway track goes straight ahead in the photo (looking south east), you can just make out some sort of camber to it, and the trees are less dense along its length off into the distance. the burn is directly behind me in the photograph.

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Old 15-02-2012, 04:03 PM
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length of rail in the burn:

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Old 15-02-2012, 04:06 PM
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bits and bobs:

Longdyke colliery coal, track dogs, fishplate, tiny pony shoe:






and an early frogless Radcliffe brick, these register as rare on my brickometer

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Old 15-02-2012, 04:27 PM
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This is back at Cawledge burn, there's a wooden foot bridge and the remains of a concrete one. The waggonway would pass about where I'm standing (or more likely over my head on a wooden bridge)

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Old 15-02-2012, 07:42 PM
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Default Longdyke tramway.

It makes sense to have used the bed of the tramway for other purposes over the years since it was abandonned.
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Old 17-02-2012, 11:11 AM
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Default Bilton Banks 100 years ago

Here's the 1911 census snapshot, birthplace in brackets:


Youngest miner is George Buglass, 13 year old hewer. [George was killed in WW1 aged 19 serving with the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers and is commemorated in Shilbottle Church - also see Commonwealth war graves ]

Oldest Bilton Banks residents are retired hewer William Swordy aged 72, and Mary Bradford widow, aged 78

We have two Colliery Blacksmiths, two Electricians and an Engineer.

The Colliery Manager and Under-manager: Joseph Armstrong Dixon and John Storey.


The manager has an 8 room house, undermanager 6, the rest of the families are in 3 room houses.






Joseph Armstrong Dixon, 43, Manager, Colliery Co., (Cambois Northumberland)
Barbara Hinin Dixon, wife, 43, (Blyth, Northumberland)
Jenny Dixon, Daughter, 17, Clerk, Coal Co. (Dunston Durham)
Norman Dixon, son, 12, (Dunston Durham)
Ursula Dixon, servant, 21, (Cowpen)


William Taylor, 55, Coal Miner Hewer (Bamburgh)
Ellenor Pringle Taylor, wife, 61, (Lowick Northumberland)


John Hindhaugh, 60, Coal Hewer, (Lowick Northumberland)
Ann Hindhaugh, wife, 55, (Newcastle Northumberland)
John Hindhaugh, son, 24, Coal Putter, (Amble Northumberland)
Elizabeth Hindhaugh, daughter, 21, (Billington Northumberland)
Richard Hindhaugh, son, 18, Coal Putter, (Lesbury Northumberland)

38250 Private John Hindhaugh, 26th (Tyneside Irish) Bn. Northumberland Fusiliers, died of wounds 12th November 1917 aged 31. Son of John and Anne Hindhaugh, of Bilton, Lesbury, Northumberland. Buried Bucquoy Road Cemetery, Ficheux, Pas de Calais, France.




Edward White Dixon, 50, Miner, Shilbottle Coal Co. (Cowpen Northumberland)
Anne Isabella Dixon, wife, 50, (Blyth Northumberland)
William Dixon, son, 19, Electrician, Shilbottle Coal Co. (Cowpen Northumberland)
Thomas Archbold Dixon, son, 16, Miner, Shilbottle Coal Co. (Cowpen Northumberland)
Edward White Dixon, son, 14, Miner, Shilbottle Coal Co. (Cowpen Northumberland)
Barbara Davison Dixon, daughter, 11, (Cowpen Northumberland)
George Wood, visitor, 18, Plumber, (Blyth Northumberland)


John Henry Henderson, 34, Coal Miner, Deputy Overman, (Shilbottle)
Martha Henderson, wife, 38, (Cambois)
Joseph Armstrong Dixon Henderson, son, 5, (Alnwick)
Richard Henderson, son, 3, (Lesbury)
John Henderson, son, 1, (Lesbury)


James John Wilson, 51, Colliery Heapkeeper, ( Shilbottle)
Jane Wilson, wife, 44, (Jedburgh Mosstour)
James John Wilson, Son, 15, Colliery Screener, (Shilbottle)
Alice Grey, daughter, married, 21, (Shilbottle)
Thomas Grey, son in law, married, 26. Colliery Miner, (Islington Northumberland)
James Grey, grandson , 0, (Bilton Banks)



John Storey, 61, Miner Under Manager, (Shilbottle )
Ann Storey, wife, 53, (Shilbottle)
Jane Storey, daughter, 32, (Shilbottle)
Isabella Storey, daughter, 30, School Teacher, County School, (Shilbottle )
John Storey, son, 25, Miner Deputy, (Shilbottle)
George Storey, son, Married, 23, Miner Hewer, (Shilbottle )
William Storey, son, 20, Clerk, (Shilbottle )
Martin A Storey, son, 18, Miner Putter, (Shilbottle)
Gladys Storey, daughter, 12, (Shilbottle)
Catherine Storey, daughter, 9, (Shilbottle)


R G Weighman, 45, Coal Miner Deputy, (North Sunderland)
Mary Weighman, wife, 50, (Shilbottle)
R G Weighman, son, 18, Coal Miner Putter, (Shilbottle)
W B Weighman, son, 12, School, (Shilbottle)
M I Weighman, Niece, 14, (Alnwick)
Thomas W Shield, Boarder, 36, Horse Keeper Underground, (Cumberland Gerri.. ??)



290499 Private Robert George Weightman, 1st/7th Bn. Northumberland Fusiliers, died 26th October 1917, age 25. Son of Robert George and Mary Weightman, of Grange Colliery; husband of Ellen Weightman, of 6, Garden Terrace, Grange Colliery, Shilbottle, Alnmouth, Northumberland. Commemorated Tyne Cot Memorial [this date of death would place him in the horror that was the battle of Passchendaele]


[note for our Military Historian John@thedrift: Any more info on this chap John???]





Samuel Edward Egdell, 40, Blacksmith, Colliery, (Shilbottle)
Jane Egdell, wife, 33, (Newcastle on Tyne)
Thomas Edward Egdell, son, 11, (Lesbury)
Dora Egdell, daughter, 11, (Lesbury)
William Egdell, son, 11, (Lesbury)
James Egdell, son, 5, (Lesbury)
Elizabeth Egdell, daughter, 4, (Lesbury)
Samuel Edward Egdell, son, 2, (Lesbury)
Mary Alice Egdell, daughter, 1, (Lesbury)



Anthony Dunbar, 41, Stationary Engineman, Colliery (Bilton Lesbury)
Rachel Dunbar, wife, 40, (Swinhoe Bambro Northd)
James Dunbar, son, 8, (Bilton Bank Lesbury Northd)
Mary Bradford, Widow, 78, (Ferneyside Ayton Northd)



Robert Baxter, 59, Coal Miner Stoneman, (Edinburgh Newton Parish)
Isabella Baxter, wife, 56, (Norham Berwick)
Robert Baxter, Son, 20, Assistant Draper, (Scremerston Berwick)
David Baxter, Son, 17, Coal Miner Putter, (Bilton Banks Lesbury)
Georgina Caroline Baxter, Daughter, 13, (Bilton Banks Lesbury)



John Queen, 37, Coal Miner Deputy, (Shilbottle)
Jane Eliza Queen, wife, 36, (Shilbottle)
John Lancelot Queen, son, 12, (Shilbottle)
Albert Percival Queen, son, 10, (Shilbottle)
Stephen Walter Queen, son, 5, Warkworth)
Francis George Queen, son, 3, (Alnwick)
Herbert Stanley Queen, son, 6 months, (Lesbury)


James Robert Punton, 37, Coal Miner Onsetter, (Amble Northumberland)
Eleanor Punton, wife, 41, (Fenwick Northd)
James Robert Punton, son, 12, School, (Bilton Banks)
Richard Lillico Punton, son, 10, (Bilton Banks)
Joseph Punton, son, 7, (Bilton Banks)
Jane Ann Air, stepdaughter, 15, (Bilton Banks)



Thomas Henry Baxter, 36, Coal Miner Master Shifter, (Ancroft)
Ellen Baxter, wife, 34, (Lesbury)
Ellen Gibson Baxter, daughter, 12, (Alnwick)
Robert Duncan Baxter, son, 9, (Shilbottle)
Henry Duncan Baxter, son, 4, (Lesbury)
Isabella Patterson Baxter, daughter, 1, (Lesbury)



John Elliott, 63, Joiner, Colliery, (Northumberland Newham)
Mary Elliott, wife, 52, (Berwickshire Duns)
Margaret Elliott, daughter, 22, (Northumberland Newham)
John Elliott, son, 22, Cert Teacher, (Northumberland Newham)
James Melville, boarder, 34, Miner, (Fifeshire Kemsway)



Joseph Snaith, head, 39, Coachman, Shilbottle Colliery, (Northumberland Willow Tree)
Snaith, Jane Eliza, wife, 38, (Northumberland Shortage [Shortridge??] )
Thomas William Snaith, son, 14, (Northumberland Eawledge Park)
Joseph Snaith, son, 13, Northumberland Eawledge Park
Sarah Elizabeth Snaith, daughter, 11, (Alnwick)
Robert Snaith, son, 6, (Bilton Bank)
Charlotte Snaith, daughter, 4, (Bilton Bank)
Norman Snaith, son, 11 months, (Bilton Bank)
William Robson, boarder, married, 35, Blacksmith, Shilbottle Colliery, (Northumberland Newton by Sea)


John James Tweedy, head, single, 22, Coal Miner Hewer, (Bilton Banks Lesbury Northd)
Mary Tweedy, mother , widow, 59, (Wooden Lesbury Northd)
Jacob Alexandrew [sic] Tweedy, brother, 20, Coal Miner Putter, (Bilton Banks Lesbury Northd)
William Purdy Tweedy, brother, 17, Coal Miner Putter, (Bilton Banks Lesbury Northd)
Jane Graham Barrass, visitor, Single, 18, Assistant In Cycle Shop, (Dinnington Village Northd)



Edward Shell, 45, Coal Miner Hewer, (Denwick)
Cicely Shell, wife, 44, (Shilbottle)
Thomas Shell, son, 20, Colliery Labour Above, Bank, (Shilbottle)
William Shell, son, 15, Pony Driver Below Ground (Newcastle)
John Earnest Shell, son, 10, (Newcastle)
James Taylor Shell, son, 8 (Long Dyke Shilbottle)
Robert Septimus Shell, son, 6 (Long Dyke Shilbottle)
Lilly Shell, niece, 12 , (Newcastle on Tyne)



William Graham, 46, Miner Hewer, (Newcastle)
Mary Graham, wife, 41, (Newham)
Margaret Graham, daughter, 17, (Choppington Station)


E Anderson, 65, Engineer, Colliery (Northumberland Stamfordham)
Mary Anderson, wife, 51, (Alnmouth Parish Northd)
C S Anderson, son, 24, Electrician, Colliery (Shilbottle Parish Northd)
Amelia Anderson, daughter, 17, Assisting Mother, (Shilbottle Parish Northd)
E K Anderson, son, 12, (Lesbury Parish Northd)
John Anderson, son, 9, (Lesbury Parish Northd)



Henry Buglass, 52, Miner, Shilbottle Coal Company, (Shilbottle)
Margaret Buglass, wife, 47, (Backworth)
Samuel Buglass, son, 23, Miner, Shilbottle Coal Company, (New York, Northld)
Henry Buglass, son, 21, Miner, Shilbottle Coal Company, (Harwell)
George Buglass, son, 13, Hewer, Shilbottle Coal Company, (Chirton)
Margaret Buglass, daughter, 11, (Amble)
James Buglass, son, 9, (Amble)
Laura Buglass, daughter, 6, (Amble)


William T Green, 56, Miner Hewer, (Shilbottle)
Jas Waddell Green, son, 28, Coal Miner Hewer, (Chevington)
John Green, son, 25, Coal Miner Hewer, (Bilton Banks Lesbury)
Robert Green, son, 22, Coal Miner Hewer, (Bilton Banks Lesbury)
Sarah Eleanor Storey, daughter, married, 18 (Bilton Banks Lesbury)
Mary Green, daughter, 16, (Bilton Banks Lesbury)
William Ternent Green, son, 13, (Bilton Banks Lesbury)
Nora Storey, granddaughter, 1 (Bilton Banks Lesbury)


John Varty, 33, Coal Miner Deputy Oveman, (Mickley Square)
Mary Ann Varty, wife, 29, (Shilbottle)
Kenneth Varty, Son, 1, (Shilbottle)


Richard Ray, 53, Coal Miner Hewer, (Lowick Northumberland)
Jane Ray, wife, 48, (Shilbottle)
James John Ray, son, 22, Colliery Blacksmith, (Bilton Banks)
Adeline Ray, daughter, 20, (Bilton Banks)
Ellen Ray, daughter, 12, (Bilton Banks)
Lillian Ray, daughter, 8, (Bilton Banks)
David Melville, boarder, 40, Miner Stoneman, (Kennoway East Fifeshire)



Joseph Douglass, 38, Winding Engineman, (Alnwick)
Ellen Jane Douglass, wife, 43, (Shilbottle)
Thomas Joseph Douglass, son, 7, (Alnwick)


Thomas Boyd, 55, Winding Brakesman, Colliery, (Lesbury)
Mary Jane Boyd, wife, 51, (Craster)
Andrew Boyd, son, 19, Colliery Putter, (Lesbury)
Elizabeth Boyd, daughter, 17, (Lesbury)
Arthur Boyd, son, 15, Colliery Driver, (Lesbury)
Edith Boyd, daughter, 11, School, (Lesbury)
Albert Boyd, son, 9, (Lesbury)


William Swordy, widower, 72, Retired Coal Hewer, ( Alnwick)
Margaret Swordy, daughter, single, 42, (Shilbottle)
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  #37  
Old 17-02-2012, 11:57 AM
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Not sure looking at that list how they squeezed some of those large families into what must have been one or two bedroom houses?
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  #38  
Old 20-02-2012, 11:44 AM
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Received last night a most interesting copy of a newspaper cutting on the sons of Robert and Isabella Baxter from the above list. I've linked this to the St James (Shilbottle) Church page on the other site.

Separate page on the Baxter Brothers
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  #39  
Old 24-02-2012, 01:43 PM
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Smile baxter brothers

Very interested in the article of the Baxter brothers as I am the great neice of the Baxters I have been researching the family history and would be very interested in hearing fron anyone who has any info about the family
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Old 27-05-2012, 09:05 AM
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On Friday, the 9th, the adjourned inquest at Shillbottle, on the body of John. Henderson, aged 15 years, was resumed before Mr Hardy, coroner. From the evidence, it appeared that, on the 31st ult., a man and five boys, of whom the deceased was one, descended the shaft of the colliery, a depth of fifty fathoms, by attaching themselves to the loop of a chain or rope. When they arrived at the bottom it was dark, and the man with four boys came off the chain, and a light was struck. One of the boys shouted "Up," and the chain was drawn up, when it was discovered that the deceased still remained- attached to it. They called again from the bottom, and the engine was stopped, and the rope reversed, when the deceased immediately fell down into the pit, and was severely crushed. He was brought to bank, carried to his lodgings, and medical assistance procured, but he never spoke, and died in about an hour. The men usually descend in a cage, and had that plan been followed on the present occasion, the accident could not have happened. Verdict--Accidentally killed.


[The Newcastle Courant Friday, April 16, 1858]



Well, I'm pleased I didn't join the mining industry in the 19th Century.
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