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  #101  
Old 29-11-2012, 10:12 AM
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Casey was the resident instructor to the TA in Amble and his family were brought up here. I went to school with his grandson, also named Walter. There were Caseys in Amble until last year when Joe Casey , son of Walter J, died he was 92 and lived in West Crescent. He worked at both Hauxley and Whittle collieries.
Jack Lynn lived next door to my grandparents in Centre Row Radcliffe and was Caseys second in command in the Home Guard in the rank of Lieutenant, he worked at Hauxley colliery and ended his days in Leslie Drive in Amble after moving from Radcliffe.
So we can add that Casey was in command of the Amble detachment of the Home Guard? (Forget that , re-reading this thread Janwhin's newspaper quote confirms he was in command)

Do you know where their HQ/meeting place was Alan? Would it be the Scott St. Drill Hall? (I'm guessing)
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  #102  
Old 29-11-2012, 11:03 AM
Alan J. Alan J. is offline
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Default Commanding officer Amble home guard.

Walter Casey was the TA instructor between the wars and as such I suppose he was an obvious choice to run the show when the home guard was formed due to his previous military experience and the fact he had also held rank as a commisioned officer. The same would apply to Jack Lynn as he had been an A/RSM in the first WW.
Their meeting place was the drill hall as you rightly suggest and they did various guard duties around Amble and district as well as weekend exercises in such locations as the moors at Longframlington among other places. My father was in the home guard as all people of a certain aged had to be, under 60 I think, but wasn't too enthusiastic due to the fact you had to report for drill nights etc after a shift filling coal at the pit or prior to going on foreshift.
Another of their guard duties was to stand sentry at the Amble reservior at Morwick, this was presumably to prevent the water supply being tampered with.
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  #103  
Old 29-11-2012, 05:22 PM
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There is an obituary for W J. Casey in the Northumberland and Alnwick Gazette, Friday Oct 4 1946, Casey having died on the previous Friday. He died suddenly cycling to work from Amble to Broomhill Colliery, where he was a private secretary. There was an inquest into his death, the details of which are in the same gazette.
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  #104  
Old 29-11-2012, 05:44 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
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Good news that there is an obituary

Would the Scott Street drill hall be where the Remembrance Day parade used to start? I seem to remember as a brownie setting off from somewhere near there. (Never did manage to get into the girl guides.)
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  #105  
Old 29-11-2012, 08:39 PM
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Default W J Casey.

Yes that was where the remembrance day parades started from, the local TA and a large detachment from RAF Acklington formed up there and marched down through Amble to the war memorial accompanied by loads of us kids and watched along the way by onlookers.
W J Casey was , I believe, managers clerk at Broomhill colliery to the then manager the" infamous" Major Alan Morrison. This man was a major shareholder in Broomhill and Hauxley collieries and oversaw the two, he had been in the first world war, hence the Major, you could buy a commision then and through this an ex army man like W J would appeal to him as his clerk. Morrison lived in Togston Hall and led a rather grand life having a driver at his disposal, gardeners etc. He "cashed in his chips" on nationalisation in 1947 and left the area. During his time at the collieries he was noted as being rather ruthless in his treatment of the workforce.

Last edited by Alan J.; 29-11-2012 at 08:41 PM.
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  #106  
Old 30-11-2012, 12:02 AM
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Interesting as ever Alan. One of those coincidences that Casey, feeling unwell, got off his bike at the entrance to the private road to Togston Hall. He spoke to someone else on the main road and then proceeded to walk to the Hall to get himself help but didn't make it, collapsing and dying on that private road. It doesn't mention in the inquest that this is his employer's house.
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  #107  
Old 30-11-2012, 11:52 AM
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the following from January 13th 1917. It refers to a Military Cross rather than a Military Medal.


Amble Hero Honoured.
Sergeant-Major Casey gets the Military Cross.

The committee of the Amble Heroes’ Fund had for their guest on sunday night at the picture hall Sergeant-Major W. J. Casey of the 7th Northumberland Fusiliers, who having been awarded the Military Cross for bravery in the field, was honoured by his fellow townsmen by being presented with a beautiful illuminated address. The hall was crowded and a silver collection which was considered satisfactory was taken as people entered the building.
The chair was occupied by Mr T. Tully chairman of the fund. The Congregational Choir kindly gave an excellent programme of music with which the various speeches were interspersed.
The presentation was made in the Coquet Picture Hall, which was crowded, by Mr Herbert Shaw, of Warkworth and Newcastle. In the course of his remarks, Mr. Shaw said he was glad the hero of that night belonged to the Northumberland Fusiliers. He had done excellent work in the training of the battalion at Alnwick and Amble, and had trained four separate battalions in France. They all honoured him for his gallant deed that had won him the Military Cross.
(Cheers)
Sergeant-Major Casey then rose to reply and received an oration (sic ovation?) He heartily thanked them for their kindness, and said how much he would appreciate the address. He spoke of the bravery of our men, and regretted the number of fine lads who had lain down their lives, and were now resting in soldiers' graves in France. Many a time he had helped to bury them, and wept over them for doing so. Their heroism made one proud to belong to such a regiment.
A vote of thanks to Mr Shaw, the singers, Picture Hall Co., and Orchestra, proposed by Mr John Horsley Smith, and seconded by Mr D.D. Kennedy, concluded the proceedings.
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  #108  
Old 30-11-2012, 07:58 PM
Alan J. Alan J. is offline
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Default W J Casey, Military Cross.

Rather strange this, I was always of the opinion that the MC, (cross), was for officers and the MM, (medal), was awarded to other ranks, that was until fairley recently when they all now get the MC. The only explanation might be he was on a temporary promotion to officer rank when he won it.
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  #109  
Old 30-11-2012, 10:26 PM
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Warrant Officers were also eligible, so he could have received it, but for some reason they seem to be preferentially awarded the DCM and Military Medal. I have a book with all the WW1 Northumberland Fusilier MCs, there are about 14 or 15 to Warrant Officers. I think what's happened here is that he has been recommended for the Military Cross, but ended up with the Military Medal. They've celebrated the MC in Amble then later he's been told it's a Military Medal.
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  #110  
Old 01-12-2012, 10:25 AM
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Actually what I've written above is not possible because the London Gazette had announced the Military Medal before this article in the Alnwick Gazette. So is it just a reporter's typo?? seems a bit odd.
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  #111  
Old 13-01-2013, 12:13 PM
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Captioned as Meeting of City Fathers 1923 - rather grandly!
For visit of Prince of Wales. Thanks again to Anne Wagstaff for pic
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  #112  
Old 02-05-2013, 10:48 AM
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Photo of Sgt Walter Casey, Northumberland Fusiliers, discussed above. Also the 'Tuck's Oilette' postcard he was the inspiration for.
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File Type: jpg casey_2.jpg (84.6 KB, 25 views)
File Type: jpg Drum_Major_Walter_Casey,_2nd_Bn,N_F_.jpg (55.4 KB, 20 views)
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  #113  
Old 30-05-2013, 06:12 PM
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Harriet was the sister of my grandfather John Coxford. She was born in the village of Corpusty Norfolk in 1860. She married Robert Buttle and they had four children together.
After Robert died she married William Lynn and had two children John and Thomas.
John resided at 3 Holywell Crescent Amble just three doors from me up till the time I left the street in 1970. At the time I never knew that we were related but he would often stop me by his gate and talk about the war but he never mentioned being decorated, he did tell me that he was the youngest serving Regimental Sergeant Major in the British Army at the time
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  #114  
Old 31-05-2013, 04:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cavman View Post
Harriet was the sister of my grandfather John Coxford. She was born in the village of Corpusty Norfolk in 1860. She married Robert Buttle and they had four children together.
After Robert died she married William Lynn and had two children John and Thomas.
John resided at 3 Holywell Crescent Amble just three doors from me up till the time I left the street in 1970. At the time I never knew that we were related but he would often stop me by his gate and talk about the war but he never mentioned being decorated, he did tell me that he was the youngest serving Regimental Sergeant Major in the British Army at the time


Great Stuff. Multiple gallantry medal winners in Hollywell Crescent!
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  #115  
Old 31-05-2013, 04:58 PM
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Also on the medal winners theme, We have for Captain Vernon Merivale (from Togston, mentioned above) a citation for the second award of the Military Cross; but we did not have a citation for the initial award - this turned up in the War Diary:

Captain Vernon Merivale
[Award recommended by Lieut Col Jackson]
For Conspicuous good work since arrival in country till he was wounded at HOOGE in June when out reconnoitring for best position from which to join in the main attack on the German positions. Particularly near FORTUIN April 25 1915, when he attempted to outflank a German Machine Gun position, and again at St. JULIEN April 26th when his company officer being wounded he took command of his Company and led them right through the attack.
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  #116  
Old 31-05-2013, 08:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan J. View Post
If it was, as we suspect, the younger one, his grandson and greatgrandsons are still in Amble. I can verify this by the names of his sons on the census.
My great uncle John Brydon Douglass who was killed on the 15th September 1916 during the battle of the Somme is mentioned on the Amble war memorial. His surname on the memorial and with the CWGC is spelt with a single "S". I wonder if he is from the same family.
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  #117  
Old 01-06-2013, 10:05 AM
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It's odd the number of errors on the war memorials. I would have thought the names would've been treble checked for accuracy.
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  #118  
Old 10-06-2013, 01:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coquet View Post
And there's this one in Amble, never seen it mentioned anywhere. must have changed its name sharpish for some reason:

Who was the mysterious Stephen that gave Stephen Street its name???


where is this???
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  #119  
Old 10-06-2013, 01:35 AM
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Aha, I did wonder
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  #120  
Old 17-08-2013, 01:15 PM
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Default Dr Currie

An interesting letter in the Newcastle Courant of 21 September 1877 from the "Sons of Neptune" of Tynemouth:
"True Heroism -Sir, We are sure it will be very gratifying to Dr Currie of Amble and the noble band of volunteers who assisted him to reach Coquet Island on Christmas Morning, to hear that Mrs Ainger has now recovered from her serious and very painful illness, and been sent home to her husband and little ones at Tynemouth Lights, where they have been removed through the kindness of the Trinity Brethren; and as we have never seen the facts of the case mentioned, they may not prove uninteresting to many of your readers. On Christmas Eve last, the light-keepers on Coquet Island were observed signalling to those on shore, but from the severity of the storm then raging, and darkness coming in, it was impossible to make them out. All through that dreadful night they continued doing so by burning tar barrels and other lights, and it was only as daylight was approaching that James Armstrong and his fearless crew manned the lifeboat, "Algernon", and went out in the greatest danger and difficulty to ascertain their wants. By this time the coastguard had read from the signals that medical aid was urgently required, when Mr Swan, chief officer, at once repaired to the residence of Dr Currie, and informed him of it. On returning to the harbour, a hurried consultation with his men and pilots was held, as to the safest way of sending the doctor off. Mr Gray kindly offered the use of the steamer, but it was considered by all to be too small to live in such a sea, only fortunately a larger one, belonging to Shields, called the "Venus" was lying, the captain of which sung out, "That if there was need at the other end we Shields folks know of no danger", a noble offer which was quickly taken advantage of, and after getting steam up, and the doctor on board, she steamed out of the harbour. The feelings of the spectators may be better felt than described, as she disappeared several times out of sight, amongst the mountainous breakers at the harbour entrance, but very quickly was seen bearing south towards the lifeboat, to put the doctor on board, after which she returned to the harbour, amidst the cheers of the on-lookers. By this time Dr Currie had reached the Island, and on arriving at the house, found that Mrs Ainger, light-keeper's wife, had again become a mother the night before, but was this morning a raving maniac. After kindly giving directions as to proper treatment, he returned by the lifeboat to the beach, amongst the surf, on the sands, below Hauxley Fishery. Too much praise cannot be awarded the lifeboatmen, steamer's crew, and others for their gallant services on this occasion; but to the worthy Doctor, who no doubt will personally feel amply rewarded by the return of his patient to health, is most certainly entitled to something more tangible than the mere thanks of the community as a mark of esteem for the noble self-sacrifice in risking his life in this manner to save that of another, for who can but picture the sigh of relief those poor people would experience on the arrival of their kind and sympathetic surgeon, who had no answer to their calls all through the long night but the roaring of the merciless storm? To Mr Dand of Hauxley Hall, sincere thanks are also due for sending horses to launch the boat on this and subsequent occasions as the doctor required, and we only repeat what is already well known on the north-east coast, that no waif from the sea calls at his door, either in the daytime or dark, but leaves it substantially relieved by him in his usually unostentatious way. We are also of opinion that not only the said doctor but others connected with this event are duly entitled to the medal of the Humane Society for this Christian and truly heroic action. This hint we think sufficient to set into action a local committee at Amble, to see that true heroism has its reward."
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