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  #61  
Old 21-09-2013, 12:46 PM
Alan J. Alan J. is offline
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RAF base at the North side, Amble, they had a cable to supply electricity which went under water from the area of the present lifeboat station and across the harbour. There must also have been a pipe for water supply as I can remember,as a boy, the harbour workers coupling hoses up to a hydrant in the same area and allowing it to stay connected for quite a while. This was presumably to top up their water tanks at the other side.
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  #62  
Old 24-09-2013, 03:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan J. View Post
RAF base at the North side, Amble, they had a cable to supply electricity which went under water from the area of the present lifeboat station and across the harbour. There must also have been a pipe for water supply as I can remember,as a boy, the harbour workers coupling hoses up to a hydrant in the same area and allowing it to stay connected for quite a while. This was presumably to top up their water tanks at the other side.
Most interesting Alan.
I think some of the interconnecting pipes for the North Side RAF base are still over there sticking out near the dirt track road. They are about 1 inch galvanized pipe. could be water or fuel.
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  #63  
Old 08-05-2014, 04:17 PM
Pablo Pablo is offline
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Hello again everyone,

I realise this is a little out of the geographical sphere of the group but I wondered if one of the "aviation" folk's could help?

I recently visited Longhoughton Churchyard and noticed a very recent grave plot (fresh bouquets/heaped soil etc.).
The headstone was of the military (C.W.G.C.) type and bore the R.A.F. motif,the name on the headstone was Squadron Leader E. Stappard.
Nothing strange there I hear you say.The intriguing part was that Squadron Leader Stappard passed away in 1978 aged 48.

I wondered if the Sqdn. Ldr. had been the unfortunate victim of an air crash in the area and had only recently been recovered?Of course it may be a simple case of re-interring due to personal wishes/family etc.

I hope someone may be able to shed some light on the subject.

Regards

Paul
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  #64  
Old 08-05-2014, 09:06 PM
leslie leslie is offline
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This is stone from CWGC War photographic project it looks very poor condition so may have been replaced .
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  #65  
Old 08-05-2014, 11:00 PM
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Coquet Coquet is offline
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Don't think it can be a Commonwealth War Graves Commission stone as they only commemorate the dead of the two world wars. Someone must have commissioned a stone that looks like one.

Freshly dug could suggest another burial has gone in recently.


There are four official war graves in St Peters Churchyard: http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead.as...name&order=asc


[Edit to add: That War Graves Photographic Project collects post war MOD stones as well which have a different shaped top -That is possibly one of those.]
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  #66  
Old 09-05-2014, 09:23 AM
leslie leslie is offline
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Originally Posted by Coquet View Post
Don't think it can be a Commonwealth War Graves Commission stone as they only commemorate the dead of the two world wars. Someone must have commissioned a stone that looks like one.

Freshly dug could suggest another burial has gone in recently.


There are four official war graves in St Peters Churchyard: http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead.as...name&order=asc


[Edit to add: That War Graves Photographic Project collects post war MOD stones as well which have a different shaped top -That is possibly one of those.]

That type is the post 1947 military headstone . could be a wife or family member interred recently , there are several Military Grave markers of recent years from Deaths while in service at RAF Boulmer. there is moves afoot now for CWGC to look after these graves , The local authorities receive payment from THe MOD to care for these graves , but if a family member is interred in plot it becomes the responsibility of the family to care for the grave itself.I was active in the CMGC war Graves Photo Project . Im away this w/e , Cavalry Memorial Parade london . or would have popped there to check names on Bouquets ??

Last edited by leslie; 09-05-2014 at 09:28 AM.
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  #67  
Old 09-05-2014, 02:12 PM
Jscott Jscott is offline
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Originally Posted by brownknees View Post
Does anyone have photos of the Battle of Britain open days in the 1940s?I went as a schoolboyc 1948 on wards but didnt have a camera then!!
No photos but I can remember the car that the pilots used to drive around broomhill red row and the drift in it had loads of writing all over it the only writing I can remember is don't laugh madam your daughter may be inside
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  #68  
Old 09-05-2014, 02:45 PM
Pablo Pablo is offline
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Hello,
Thanks for the information,in hindsight,I should of checked the bouquets!
I realise that due to the date,1978,it would not be a C.W.G.C. headstone,I just used that as a reference.I am not very knowledgable on military headstone types.
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  #69  
Old 09-05-2014, 03:48 PM
Derilda Derilda is offline
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Wink Re: "Blue Streak - mis-guided missile"

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Originally Posted by Jscott View Post
No photos but I can remember the car that the pilots used to drive around broomhill red row and the drift in it had loads of writing all over it the only writing I can remember is don't laugh madam your daughter may be inside
I have to say, "Sorry. This car you mention belonged to Mr Gordon Scott, of 22 Chibburn Avenue, Hadston." I have used the writing on the other side of that you quoted, and on the back were two hands painted, one either side of the back window and the instruction "Push Here".
The car was a Austin Seven, and the first car I ever drove - illegally - along the links from Hadston to Linkhouse.
Gordon would turn in his grave to be associated with the RAF. He did his National Service in the Royal Navy.
I have other tales about this car but will cease boring everyone.
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  #70  
Old 09-05-2014, 04:44 PM
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hollydog hollydog is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Derilda View Post
I have to say, "Sorry. This car you mention belonged to Mr Gordon Scott, of 22 Chibburn Avenue, Hadston." I have used the writing on the other side of that you quoted, and on the back were two hands painted, one either side of the back window and the instruction "Push Here".
The car was a Austin Seven, and the first car I ever drove - illegally - along the links from Hadston to Linkhouse.
Gordon would turn in his grave to be associated with the RAF. He did his National Service in the Royal Navy.
I have other tales about this car but will cease boring everyone.
No, gan on I'm listening!
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  #71  
Old 09-05-2014, 09:57 PM
Derilda Derilda is offline
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Talking OK. Just for Hollydog.

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No, gan on I'm listening!
I lived next door to Gordon, and THE car. I was courting my wife at Amble and Gordon arranged to take us for a run. To make up a foursome one of my wifes friends came along too. As we drove out of Amble, on Ross's corner stood a group of women who were laughing at the car with all the writing on it. One of them was Hilda's friends mother. Her daughter really was inside. Luckily, maybe because daughter sunk to the car floor, mum didn't realise her daughter was inside!
We drove to Bamburgh and parked on the approach to the castle. Tourists were coming out of the castle just to look at the car.
Happy times.
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  #72  
Old 02-11-2014, 12:04 PM
Newbiggin born Newbiggin born is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coquet View Post
I was wondering what was going on in that film with the 'machine gun' sound - that Bofors Gun has a Bren Gun mounted on top - must have used that combination for ranging. Hey you learn a little every day.

The Chieftain used a similar system with a co-axial mounted LMG firing 3 round bursts of tracer before the main gun was fired.
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  #73  
Old 02-11-2014, 05:20 PM
leslie leslie is offline
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Chieftain as with Centurion MBT had a .50 Browning heavy Machine gun coaxially mounted as a ranging gun for main armaments.
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  #74  
Old 04-11-2014, 04:24 PM
cavman cavman is offline
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The .50 Browning machine gun that Leslie mentioned was fitted with a "Maxi-Ford" solenoid. This controlled the amount of rounds fired in a burst(3)
The Gunner would fire the gun by pressing a pedal at his feet and he would adjust his aim until he achieved a hit on the target with one or more rounds.
Once the range had been established he would then fire a main gun round (120mm) at the target and hopefully achieve a first round hit
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  #75  
Old 04-12-2016, 06:22 AM
jim jim is offline
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15318012_10210837307032611_732022811218936122_n.jpg hi all out detecting yesterday and unearthed this a polish flying officers cap badge probably from 317 squadron ww2..found near the site of an raf camp(now gone) a couple of miles away from acklington air base.

Last edited by jim; 04-12-2016 at 06:26 AM.
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  #76  
Old 04-12-2016, 10:54 AM
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Superb find. You could probably narrow the owner down to a couple of dozen guys...

Have any of the fixings survived on the back?

You need to tie a label on it with provenance for posterity. Classic local history museum piece.
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  #77  
Old 04-12-2016, 12:01 PM
jim jim is offline
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only one fixing on the back left i read they were only 12 at acklington..i think he must of been flying from eshott as i found it very close to an raf camp where he may have been billeted..very rare badge i would say
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  #78  
Old 27-12-2017, 05:33 PM
louisec9 louisec9 is offline
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Default Lancaster bomber 68? Squadron

Anyone remember William Rich at RAF Acklington
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  #79  
Old 12-01-2018, 07:58 PM
borderlad borderlad is offline
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Default RAF Acklington gate guard and 1939 newspaper cutting

My Spitfire photo from mid 60s
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File Type: jpg 1939 Acklington (2).JPG (92.2 KB, 22 views)
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