Coquet and Coast Forum
Don't forget to check out our sister site: Amble and District

Go Back   Coquet and Coast Forum > Local History, Genealogy, People and Places > Togston, Broomhill, Hadston and Red Row

 We no longer use activation emails. Please allow 24h after sign up and your account should work
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 05-01-2015, 04:53 PM
fraserj fraserj is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Morpeth
Posts: 16
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by janwhin View Post
I mentioned in my first post that my gt grandfather (Thomas Beverley) was one of the original trustees of the Mission. He and his family (but not my grandmother and her sister) emigrated to Australia in May 1913. The family memory is that they went with a significant number of the Mission families to take up a land grant in Western Australia. We certainly have a large group photo taken in the outback. The sons were soon felling timber for the building of the railroad but by 1917 they had moved to NSW (Weston) and back into the pits. My grandmother received a letter in 1944 about the funeral of another sister in Weston: "Lots of the old Broomhill folks were at the funeral....Alexander Sanderson, Will Slater, Jimmie Richardson, Lizzie Charlton, the Forster family (related to Beverleys), Will Beverley, Gil Percy, Mrs Cloud, Mrs Liddle, Mrs George Bell's daughter and others.."
I wonder if anybody has family memories about this group of people?
I discovered this thread while researching my Great-Uncle, William Bell Slater, and believe that he is the Will Slater mentioned. I didn't realise that so many people from the Broomhill/Amble area emigrated to Australia.

Does anyone know if the Broomhill Christian Mission was actually instrumental in organising the emigrations? On the face of it, it doesn't seem likely as the families in Janwhin's thread, that I've been able to track down so far, appear to have moved anywhere between 1910 and 1925.

Undoubtedly, many of them will have known each other, probably working in the pits at Broomhill, Chevington, Radcliffe etc. and so if you were thinking of starting a new life somewhere else it was probably natural to go to a place where you knew there was a community of people that you already knew and that there was work for you to go to. Still, life must have been pretty hard at that time for so many of them to move to the other side of the world!

I distant relative in Australia suggested that I look at this site called TROVE
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/search?adv=y It is an Australian Government site, run by the National Library, with newspapers from throughout Australia all available online and for free - they are fully searchable. So if anyone is tracing Australian family members this is probably a good site for info on them.
It is being added to all the time and contains newspapers from around Australia - all for free.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 05-01-2015, 05:18 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Nr Eglingham
Posts: 1,356
Default

I don't believe the Mission was instrumental in the emigrations, although a common thread was the families' Methodism. My great grandfather was sponsored by two ex Broomhill residents, Walter and John Arnott (Togston Terrace).
The Arnotts and their extended family had gone to Western Australia in 1906. Their daughter Margaret was married to William Slater!
There must have been ongoing correspondence between the Arnotts and the Beverleys if they sponsored them in 1913. The local newspapers were pushing emigration to Australia and Canada too.
The local newspaper article in 1906 stated that the Arnotts were responding to the "Westralian" government's opening up of new districts in small blocks to "suit the enterprising colonist."
Here's the group photograph in Western Australia, along with watering cans
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Broomhill Mission Group-W.Australia.jpg (89.5 KB, 12 views)
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 05-01-2015, 08:55 PM
fraserj fraserj is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Morpeth
Posts: 16
Default

What a pity that we can't put names to the faces!
Sadly Margaret Slater (nee Arnott) died in 1920 and William then married Jane Wilson, the widow of George William Wilson in 1921. The Wilsons also emigrated to the Weston/Kurri Kurri area of NSW to work in the mines. George was killed in by a fall of stone at Hebburn Colliery (NSW not Tyne & Wear) in 1918.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 05-01-2015, 10:24 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Nr Eglingham
Posts: 1,356
Default

And here's a photo of Hebburn Pit. My great uncle worked in the colliery offices there. We got the photo on a visit to the mining museum in Kurri Kurri last year.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Hebbern new pit.jpg (94.4 KB, 17 views)
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 05-01-2015, 10:39 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Nr Eglingham
Posts: 1,356
Default

This was the one I was really meaning to upload.....Hebburn No.1 pit
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Hebburn No. 1 Pit0007.jpg (112.2 KB, 20 views)
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 05-02-2015, 10:16 PM
Gloster Hill Gloster Hill is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 3
Default A Posting from RootsWeb

On 17/01/2010 17:28, Dee Dunn wrote:
> Please can anyone help with information regarding an event that occurred on the 21st December 1939 when a Hampden bomber returning to RAF Acklington crashed into the Chapel at North Broomhill, Northumberland, on the edge of the aerodrome. The bomber was from 49 Squadron and was short of fuel and having problems. As a result, the pilot was seriously injured and sadly two members of the crew were killed.

That must be the sanitized "official" version of the story. In truth
is that this was an early case of "friendly fire" or "blue on blue"
as the military prefer. As I report at

http://www.ne-diary.bpears.org.uk/Inc/ISeq_02.html#D110

"A British Hampden bomber, shot down in error by Spitfires of 602
Squadron, crashed on to the Church of Christ, Togston Terrace,
Amble. The church was demolished. One person was killed and one
was injured. Of the bomber's crew, one was uninjured, one was
seriously injured and two were killed."

This was dreadful incident in which Spitfires based at Drem
engaged Hampden bombers of based at Scampton and Waddington
as they returned from a difficult mission to find and attack the
pocket battleship "Deutschland" which had been reported off
Norway.

As the bombers of 44, 49 and 83 Squadrons returned from their
mission, short of fuel and in bad visibility, they decided to
make for Acklington instead of their home bases, but they were
misidentified by radar operators who scrambled the Spitfires
from 49 and 602 Squadrons and Hurricanes from 43 Squadron.

The Hampdens from 49 Squadron were intercepted by the Hurricanes
but were correctly identified and escorted to a safe landing at
Acklington. The remainder of the Hampdens were engaged by three of
the Spitfires before they were identified as British. Two of the
bombers were shot down into the sea, though all but one of the
crews survived and were rescued by fishermen. A third Hampden,
damaged and out of fuel, tried to reach Acklington, but struck
Christ Church and burst into flames.

A fourth Hampden, not involved in the friendly fire, made a forced
landing in a field near Belford.

Brian
--
Brian Pears (Gateshead, UK) http://www.bpears.org.uk/
Joint List Admin NORTHUMBRIA Genealogy Mailing List
GENUKI Northumberland Maintainer
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 06-02-2015, 08:59 PM
Derilda Derilda is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Metheringham, Lincs
Posts: 101
Unhappy Re: The Christian Mission, North Broomhill

Quote:
Originally Posted by janwhin View Post
In 1891 my great grandfather was a trustee of the hall and was hauled in front of Alnwick magistrates for allowing the hall to be occupied before the sanitary authority had issued a license confirming that the property had a good and wholesome water supply. The authority had refused a certificate on the basis that there was no supply nearby. The ground floor was a dwelling and first floor was the hall, situated at the north end of Togston Terrace. It turned into a bit of a joke because it had no worse access to water than anywhere else in the village. The hall was a methodist establishment and by 1902 there was a church and foundation stones laid for an extension for a hall and class rooms. This seems to be where the Church of Christ is now, built to replace the original when it was destroyed in 1939 when a bomber crashed into it. I don't know whether anyone has more info? Photo below shows the extended church in I think 1908 when the then Prince of Wales visited Northumberland.
Can I just add a little to this topic. Visitors to the site from outside of Northumberland may get confused about where the Christian Mission is. It is situated on Chapel Row, North Broomhill, just past the south east end of Togston Terrace. The chapel that the Hampden crashed onto in 1939, and rebuilt post war, is the Church of Christ, on the opposite side of the road from Togston Crescent.
I haven't been near the Christian Mission for several years I must confess but, viewing on Google Earth shows it to be in a bad state of repair.
Just thought I would try and clear any confusion. The two street names are very similar.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 07-02-2015, 12:53 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Nr Eglingham
Posts: 1,356
Default

Derilda, thanks for the clarification it makes more sense in terms of my photograph. My dad was most likely baptised at the chapel but he only ever spoke about the church, because of it being flattened. I merged the two in my head

I don't know, one of my sisters lived in Turnbull's Buildings years ago and my uncle had a garage at the Acklington Road junction, opposite the church.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 07-02-2015, 05:03 PM
Derilda Derilda is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Metheringham, Lincs
Posts: 101
Wink Re: Uncle's Garage

Quote:
Originally Posted by janwhin View Post
Derilda, thanks for the clarification it makes more sense in terms of my photograph. My dad was most likely baptised at the chapel but he only ever spoke about the church, because of it being flattened. I merged the two in my head

I don't know, one of my sisters lived in Turnbull's Buildings years ago and my uncle had a garage at the Acklington Road junction, opposite the church.
That would be Billy Whinham and Johnny Park. (Excuse if I have got spelling wrong) Their garage was on the west end of Togston Crescent and must have had a near miss when the Hampden crashed. I hope they were both out on their rounds when that happened.
They travelled various districts selling paraffin and all manner of goods that, usually, were not available to outlying areas. I also remember another occasion, when Herbie Smailes' garage had a major blaze, just a little up Acklington Road from them. Possibly about 1947.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 07-02-2015, 05:12 PM
janwhin janwhin is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Nr Eglingham
Posts: 1,356
Default

Yes, my uncle was Bill Whinham, he tended to visit the more remote country areas with his van, Johnny Park was more local to Broomhill.
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 23-06-2015, 07:25 PM
pineman pineman is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: hadston
Posts: 6
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Coquet View Post
I've heard the friendly fire story before but don't know what the source of that is. If it was true nothing would be published at the time; it would have to come later from the MoD or Squadron records I think.
hi again Coquet!
as usual looking through some old threads ,came across this one about the Hamden Bomber, i feel that i must mention that i had a grandstand view of this
crash. i was working for H.Smails at the time (only 15) i heard the planes coming in, and stood at the gate, watching them land, except this particular one.as he made to land a red flare came up,he then flew around to come back over the Trap (pub), the engines sounded ropey, he was losing height all the
time, just missed Broughs store then bang into the chappell .
being a young lad at the time i got a fright. the rest is what you have read about still makes me shiver when i think about it....
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 28-06-2015, 08:37 PM
Coquet's Avatar
Coquet Coquet is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Amble
Posts: 3,213
Default

Astounding Pineman, never thought we'd see a first hand account on here.
I can't imagine what it must be like to be in the vicinity of an air-crash; and these planes an not small. Frighting.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 21-08-2021, 10:42 AM
Hadston-Green Hadston-Green is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 24
Default Plane Crash D camber 1939

This article appeared in the Newcastle Chronicle in December 1939

Hadston-Green
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 07:10 AM.


Powered by: vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.